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      Acute Necrotizing Encephalitis as a Probable Association of COVID-19

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          A bstract

          Background

          Meanwhile, over 50 lakh people have now been affected by coronavirus disease-2019 (COVID-19) across the globe. There are various reports on neurological manifestations of COVID-19, which have attracted broad attention. Acute necrotizing encephalopathy (ANE) is a rare complication of influenza and other viral infections and has been related to intracranial cytokine storm, which results in breach in blood–brain barrier leading to encephalitis like presentation. We report an unusual case of acute necrotizing encephalitis as a solitary presentation of COVID-19.

          Case description

          We report a case of 35-year-old man from Bihar, presented to our emergency department in unconscious state, with high-grade fever and vomiting since last 5 days. Previous magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) brain showed a left parasellar-middle cranial fossa mass looks most likely like an invasive meningioma. Urgent noncontrast computed tomography scan (NCCT) brain showed that mass as well as hypodensities in both thalami and left caudate nucleus. As per our institutional protocol, clinical management of raised intracranial pressure was initiated. As there is no current evidence from any randomized control trails (RCTs) to recommend any specific treatment for suspected or confirmed patients with COVID-19 with acute necrotizing encephalitis.

          Conclusion

          Our case highlights the importance of identifying encephalitis as a presenting sign of COVID-19 based on NCCT findings with normal cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and normal chest X-ray (CXR) findings.

          How to cite this article

          Kumar N, Kumar S, Kumar A, Pati BK, Kumar A, Singh C, et al. Acute Necrotizing Encephalitis as a Probable Association of COVID-19. Indian J Crit Care Med 2020;24(10):991–994.

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          Most cited references7

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          COVID-19: consider cytokine storm syndromes and immunosuppression

          As of March 12, 2020, coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) has been confirmed in 125 048 people worldwide, carrying a mortality of approximately 3·7%, 1 compared with a mortality rate of less than 1% from influenza. There is an urgent need for effective treatment. Current focus has been on the development of novel therapeutics, including antivirals and vaccines. Accumulating evidence suggests that a subgroup of patients with severe COVID-19 might have a cytokine storm syndrome. We recommend identification and treatment of hyperinflammation using existing, approved therapies with proven safety profiles to address the immediate need to reduce the rising mortality. Current management of COVID-19 is supportive, and respiratory failure from acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is the leading cause of mortality. 2 Secondary haemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (sHLH) is an under-recognised, hyperinflammatory syndrome characterised by a fulminant and fatal hypercytokinaemia with multiorgan failure. In adults, sHLH is most commonly triggered by viral infections 3 and occurs in 3·7–4·3% of sepsis cases. 4 Cardinal features of sHLH include unremitting fever, cytopenias, and hyperferritinaemia; pulmonary involvement (including ARDS) occurs in approximately 50% of patients. 5 A cytokine profile resembling sHLH is associated with COVID-19 disease severity, characterised by increased interleukin (IL)-2, IL-7, granulocyte-colony stimulating factor, interferon-γ inducible protein 10, monocyte chemoattractant protein 1, macrophage inflammatory protein 1-α, and tumour necrosis factor-α. 6 Predictors of fatality from a recent retrospective, multicentre study of 150 confirmed COVID-19 cases in Wuhan, China, included elevated ferritin (mean 1297·6 ng/ml in non-survivors vs 614·0 ng/ml in survivors; p 39·4°C 49 Organomegaly None 0 Hepatomegaly or splenomegaly 23 Hepatomegaly and splenomegaly 38 Number of cytopenias * One lineage 0 Two lineages 24 Three lineages 34 Triglycerides (mmol/L) 4·0 mmol/L 64 Fibrinogen (g/L) >2·5 g/L 0 ≤2·5 g/L 30 Ferritin ng/ml 6000 ng/ml 50 Serum aspartate aminotransferase <30 IU/L 0 ≥30 IU/L 19 Haemophagocytosis on bone marrow aspirate No 0 Yes 35 Known immunosuppression † No 0 Yes 18 The Hscore 11 generates a probability for the presence of secondary HLH. HScores greater than 169 are 93% sensitive and 86% specific for HLH. Note that bone marrow haemophagocytosis is not mandatory for a diagnosis of HLH. HScores can be calculated using an online HScore calculator. 11 HLH=haemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis. * Defined as either haemoglobin concentration of 9·2 g/dL or less (≤5·71 mmol/L), a white blood cell count of 5000 white blood cells per mm3 or less, or platelet count of 110 000 platelets per mm3 or less, or all of these criteria combined. † HIV positive or receiving longterm immunosuppressive therapy (ie, glucocorticoids, cyclosporine, azathioprine).
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            Neurological associations of COVID-19

            Summary Background The COVID-19 pandemic, caused by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), is of a scale not seen since the 1918 influenza pandemic. Although the predominant clinical presentation is with respiratory disease, neurological manifestations are being recognised increasingly. On the basis of knowledge of other coronaviruses, especially those that caused the severe acute respiratory syndrome and Middle East respiratory syndrome epidemics, cases of CNS and peripheral nervous system disease caused by SARS-CoV-2 might be expected to be rare. Recent developments A growing number of case reports and series describe a wide array of neurological manifestations in 901 patients, but many have insufficient detail, reflecting the challenge of studying such patients. Encephalopathy has been reported for 93 patients in total, including 16 (7%) of 214 hospitalised patients with COVID-19 in Wuhan, China, and 40 (69%) of 58 patients in intensive care with COVID-19 in France. Encephalitis has been described in eight patients to date, and Guillain-Barré syndrome in 19 patients. SARS-CoV-2 has been detected in the CSF of some patients. Anosmia and ageusia are common, and can occur in the absence of other clinical features. Unexpectedly, acute cerebrovascular disease is also emerging as an important complication, with cohort studies reporting stroke in 2–6% of patients hospitalised with COVID-19. So far, 96 patients with stroke have been described, who frequently had vascular events in the context of a pro-inflammatory hypercoagulable state with elevated C-reactive protein, D-dimer, and ferritin. Where next? Careful clinical, diagnostic, and epidemiological studies are needed to help define the manifestations and burden of neurological disease caused by SARS-CoV-2. Precise case definitions must be used to distinguish non-specific complications of severe disease (eg, hypoxic encephalopathy and critical care neuropathy) from those caused directly or indirectly by the virus, including infectious, para-infectious, and post-infectious encephalitis, hypercoagulable states leading to stroke, and acute neuropathies such as Guillain-Barré syndrome. Recognition of neurological disease associated with SARS-CoV-2 in patients whose respiratory infection is mild or asymptomatic might prove challenging, especially if the primary COVID-19 illness occurred weeks earlier. The proportion of infections leading to neurological disease will probably remain small. However, these patients might be left with severe neurological sequelae. With so many people infected, the overall number of neurological patients, and their associated health burden and social and economic costs might be large. Health-care planners and policy makers must prepare for this eventuality, while the many ongoing studies investigating neurological associations increase our knowledge base.
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              Nervous system involvement after infection with COVID-19 and other coronaviruses

              Highlights • Coronoviruses not only affect the respiratory system, but also have deleterious effects on the central nervous system. • Most neurological diseases could be caused by coronoviruses invasion. • Coronoviruses cause nerve damage via diverse pathways.
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                Author and article information

                Journal
                Indian J Crit Care Med
                Indian J Crit Care Med
                IJCCM
                Indian Journal of Critical Care Medicine : Peer-reviewed, Official Publication of Indian Society of Critical Care Medicine
                Jaypee Brothers Medical Publishers
                0972-5229
                1998-359X
                October 2020
                : 24
                : 10
                : 991-994
                Affiliations
                [1,5 ]Department of Trauma and Emergency, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, Patna, Bihar, India
                [2 ]Department of Radiodiagnosis, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, Patna, Bihar, India
                [3 ]Department of Anaesthesiology, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, Patna, Bihar, India
                [4,7 ]Department of Microbiology, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, Patna, Bihar, India
                [6 ]Department of Community and Family Medicine, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, Patna, Bihar, India
                Author notes
                Neeraj Kumar, Department of Trauma and Emergency, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, Patna, Bihar, India, Phone: +91 8210104972, e-mail: neeraj.jlnmc@ 123456gmail.com
                Article
                10.5005/jp-journals-10071-23636
                7689130
                33281329
                2c934fcf-d96b-42e6-bf4b-c599df052a66
                Copyright © 2020; Jaypee Brothers Medical Publishers (P) Ltd.

                © The Author(s). 2020 Open Access This article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License ( https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and non-commercial reproduction in any medium, provided you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made. The Creative Commons Public Domain Dedication waiver ( http://creativecommons.org/publicdomain/zero/1.0/) applies to the data made available in this article, unless otherwise stated.

                History
                Categories
                Case Report

                Emergency medicine & Trauma
                acute necrotizing encephalitis,altered sensorium,computed tomography,covid case report,coronavirus disease-2019 in india,encephalopathy,magnetic resonance imaging

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