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      Meat quality of Angus, Simmental, Charolais and Limousin steers compared at the same intramuscular fat content.

      Meat science

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          Abstract

          Meat quality and marbling properties of Angus, Simmental, Charolais and Limousin steers (4×16) were compared at an average intramuscular fat content (IMF) of 3.25% in the M. longissimus dorsi. The steers were fattened on a forage-based diet until the desired, ultrasonically estimated IMF content was reached which resulted in considerably different growth and carcass characteristics. The Angus group showed a growth rate similar to Simmental and Charolais while Limousin grew slower, became oldest and provided the heaviest carcasses and best conformation. Angus carcasses showed the lowest weight but the highest fatness score. Marbling was equal for all breeds. Angus and Charolais provided pale meat with low haem iron content. Angus and Limousin beef was more tender on sensory assessment than Simmental beef, corresponding to differences found in shear force (non-significant) and myofibrillar fragmentation index measured at 48 h post mortem. Flavour was similar among breed groups while juiciness was highest for Limousin and lowest for Angus. The juicier beef simultaneously showed the highest drip but the lowest cooking losses. In conclusion, clear differences in meat quality were observed between breeds despite similar IMF contents.

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          Most cited references 23

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          RELATIONSHIP OF MYOFIBRIL FRAGMENTATION INDEX TO CERTAIN CHEMICAL, PHYSICAL AND SENSORY CHARACTERISTICS OF BOVINE LONGISSIMUS MUSCLE

           R. CULLER,  F. JR,  G Smith (1978)
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            Consumer preferences for beef color and packaging did not affect eating satisfaction.

            We investigated whether consumer preferences for beef colors (red, purple, and brown) or for beef packaging systems (modified atmosphere, MAP; vacuum skin pack, VSP; or overwrap with polyvinyl chloride, PVC) influenced taste scores of beef steaks and patties. To test beef color effects, boneless beef top loin steaks (choice) and ground beef patties (20% fat) were packaged in different atmospheres to promote development of red, purple, and brown color. To test effects of package type, steaks and patties were pre-treated with carbon monoxide in MAP to promote development of red color, and some meat was repackaged using VSP or PVC overwrap. The differently colored and packaged meats were separately displayed for members of four consumer panels who evaluated appearance and indicated their likelihood to purchase similar meat. Next, the panelists tasted meat samples from what they had been told were the packaging treatments just observed. However, the meat samples actually served were from a single untreated steak or patty. Thus, any difference in taste scores should reflect expectations established during the visual evaluation. The same ballot and sample coding were used for both the visual and taste evaluations. Color and packaging influenced (P purple >brown and PVC >VSP>MAP. Appearance scores and likelihood to purchase were correlated (r=0.9). However, color or packaging did not affect (P>0.5) taste scores. Thus, consumer preferences for beef color and packaging influenced likelihood to purchase, but did not bias eating satisfaction.
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              Meat quality of steers finished on autumn grass, grass silage or concentrate-based diets.

              The objective of this experiment was to determine the effect of varying the proportions of autumn grass and concentrates and grass silage and concentrates on the quality of meat from cattle with similar rates of carcass growth. Fifty continental crossbred steers were assigned to five treatments. The experimental diets offered were (1) grass silage ad libitum plus 4 kg concentrate (SC), (2) 1 kg hay plus 8 kg concentrate (CO), (3) 6 kg grass dry matter (DM) plus 5 kg concentrate (CG), (4) 12 kg grass DM plus 2.5 kg concentrate (GC) and (5) 22 kg grass DM (GO). The experiment lasted 85 days after which all animals were slaughtered. The right side m. longissmus dorsi was excised from all animals 24 h post slaughter for assessment of meat quality. Treatments SC and CO resulted in animals with whiter (P<0.05) subcutaneous and kidney/channel fat than all other treatments. There was an interaction (P<0.05) between ageing time and treatment with treatment GC having higher (P<0.05) tenderness, texture and acceptability values after 2 days ageing, but not after 7 or 14 days ageing. It is concluded that supplementing grass with low levels of concentrate produced the most tender and acceptable meat at 2 days post mortem, but that further ageing eliminated all treatment effects on eating quality of beef.
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                Journal
                22062519

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