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      The Mini International Neuropsychiatric Interview (MINI). A short diagnostic structured interview: reliability and validity according to the CIDI

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          Summary

          The Mini International Neuropsychiatric Interview (MINI) is a short diagnostic structured interview (DSI) developed in France and the United States to explore 17 disorders according to Diagnostic and Statistical Manual (DSM)-III-R diagnostic criteria. It is fully structured to allow administration by non-specialized interviewers. In order to keep it short it focuses on the existence of current disorders. For each disorder, one or two screening questions rule out the diagnosis when answered negatively. Probes for severity, disability or medically explained symptoms are not explored symptom-by-symptom. Two joint papers present the inter-rater and test-retest reliability of the MINI the validity versus the Composite International Diagnostic Interview (CIDI) (this paper) and the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-III-R patients (SCID) (joint paper). Three-hundred and forty-six patients (296 psychiatric and 50 non-psychiatric) were administered the MINI and the CIDI ‘gold standard’. Forty two were interviewed by two investigators and 42 interviewed subsequently within two days. Interviewers were trained to use both instruments. The mean duration of the interview was 21 min with the MINI and 92 for corresponding sections of the CIDI. Kappa coefficient, sensitivity and specificity were good or very good for all diagnoses with the exception of generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) (kappa = 0.36), agoraphobia (sensitivity = 0.59) and bulimia (kappa = 0.53). Interrater and test-retest reliability were good. The main reasons for discrepancies were identified. The MINI provided reliable DSM-III-R diagnoses within a short time frame, The study permitted improvements in the formulations for GAD and agoraphobia in the current DSM-IV version of the MINI.

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          The Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-III-R (SCID)

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            Recognition, management, and course of anxiety and depression in general practice.

            This article addresses the issues of recognition of psychiatric disorders by general physicians (GPs) and the effects of recognition on management and course. Among 1994 patients who were screened with the General Health Questionnaire and who were rated by their GP, 1450 (72.7%) had not been identified by the GP as having a psychiatric disorder in the year before the index visit. Among these "new" patients, 557 (38.4%) had positive General Health Questionnaire scores. Only 47% of the new patients who met Bedford College diagnostic criteria for anxiety, depression, or ill-defined disorder had their psychiatric disorder recognized by their GP. Among patients who met Bedford College criteria, mean episode durations were longer for anxiety disorders (20 to 22 months) than for depressive disorders (9 to 10 months). Among the new patients, those with psychiatric disorders recognized by the GP were more likely to receive mental health interventions. Recognition was associated with shorter episode duration among patients with an anxiety disorder, but not among patients with depressive or ill-defined disorders.
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              Depression in medical in-patients.

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                Author and article information

                Journal
                European Psychiatry
                Eur. psychiatr.
                Elsevier BV
                0924-9338
                1778-3585
                1997
                April 16 2020
                1997
                : 12
                : 5
                : 224-231
                Article
                10.1016/S0924-9338(97)83296-8
                2cdf329f-0dfb-4ef1-af8b-c77f8079435c
                © 1997

                https://www.cambridge.org/core/terms


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