Blog
About

48
views
0
recommends
+1 Recommend
1 collections
    1
    shares
      • Record: found
      • Abstract: found
      • Article: found

      GREEN BUILDING AND BIODIVERSITY: FACILITATING BIRD FRIENDLY DESIGN WITH BUILDING INFORMATION MODELS

      Read this article at

      ScienceOpenPublisher
      Bookmark
          There is no author summary for this article yet. Authors can add summaries to their articles on ScienceOpen to make them more accessible to a non-specialist audience.

          Abstract

          Green buildings should respect nature and endeavor to mitigate harmful effects to the environment and occupants. This is often interpreted as creating sustainable sites, consuming less energy and water, reusing materials, and providing excellent indoor environmental quality. Environmentally friendly buildings should also consider literally the impact that they have on birds, millions of them. A major factor in bird collisions with buildings is the choice of building materials. These choices are usually made by the architect who may not be aware of the issue or may be looking for guidance from certification programs such as LEED. As a proof of concept for an educational tool, we developed a software-assisted approach to characterize whether a proposed building design would earn a point for the LEED Pilot Credit 55: Avoiding Bird Collisions. Using the visual programming language Dynamo with the common building information modeling software Revit, we automated the assessment of designs. The approach depends on parameters that incorporate assessments of bird threat for façade materials, analyzes building geometry relative to materials, and processes user input on building operation to produce the assessment.

          Related collections

          Most cited references 41

          • Record: found
          • Abstract: not found
          • Article: not found

          Bird–building collisions in the United States: Estimates of annual mortality and species vulnerability

            Bookmark
            • Record: found
            • Abstract: found
            • Article: found
            Is Open Access

            Collision Mortality Has No Discernible Effect on Population Trends of North American Birds

            Avian biodiversity is threatened by numerous anthropogenic factors and migratory species are especially at risk. Migrating birds frequently collide with manmade structures and such losses are believed to represent the majority of anthropogenic mortality for North American birds. However, estimates of total collision mortality range across several orders of magnitude and effects on population dynamics remain unknown. Herein, we develop a novel method to assess relative vulnerability to anthropogenic threats, which we demonstrate using 243,103 collision records from 188 species of eastern North American landbirds. After correcting mortality estimates for variation attributable to population size and geographic overlap with potential collision structures, we found that per capita vulnerability to collision with buildings and towers varied over more than four orders of magnitude among species. Species that migrate long distances or at night were much more likely to be killed by collisions than year-round residents or diurnal migrants. However, there was no correlation between relative collision mortality and long-term population trends for these same species. Thus, although millions of North American birds are killed annually by collisions with manmade structures, this source of mortality has no discernible effect on populations.
              Bookmark
              • Record: found
              • Abstract: not found
              • Article: not found

              Avian mortality at communication towers in the United States and Canada: which species, how many, and where?

                Bookmark

                Author and article information

                Journal
                jgrb
                Journal of Green Building
                College Publishing
                1552-6100
                1943-4618
                1943-4618
                Spring 2016
                : 11
                : 2
                : 116-130
                Author notes

                1. University of Southern California, School of Architecture, Watt Hall #204, Los Angeles, CA 90089-0291 (corresponding author) kensek@ 123456usc.edu , (213) 740-2081

                2. University of Southern California, School of Architecture

                3. University of Southern California, School of Architecture and Spatial Sciences Institute

                Article
                jgb.11.2.116
                10.3992/jgb.11.2.116.1
                ©2016 by College Publishing. All rights reserved.
                Page count
                Pages: 15
                Product
                Categories
                RESEARCH

                Comments

                Comment on this article