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      Meloxicam for intravenous use: review of its clinical efficacy and safety for management of postoperative pain

      1 , 2 , 2
      Pain Management
      Future Medicine Ltd

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          Abstract

          Meloxicam for intravenous use (meloxicam iv.) is a nanocrystal formulation with improved dissolution properties and shortened time to peak plasma concentrations versus oral meloxicam. In Phase III and IIIb trials, 30 mg once daily relieved pain following pre- or postoperative administration in orthopedic, abdominal and colorectal surgeries. Meloxicam iv. was associated with reduced opioid consumption, the clinical benefit of which remains unclear. The drug may be administered alone or in combination with other non-nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. In Phase III trials, it demonstrated adverse event profile similar to placebo, with nausea, constipation, vomiting and headache occurring most frequently. Meloxicam iv. does not appear to adversely affect platelet function or wound-healing parameters. No new safety signals were detected in the Phase IIIb studies.

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          Most cited references33

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          Management of Postoperative Pain: A Clinical Practice Guideline From the American Pain Society, the American Society of Regional Anesthesia and Pain Medicine, and the American Society of Anesthesiologists' Committee on Regional Anesthesia, Executive Committee, and Administrative Council.

          Most patients who undergo surgical procedures experience acute postoperative pain, but evidence suggests that less than half report adequate postoperative pain relief. Many preoperative, intraoperative, and postoperative interventions and management strategies are available for reducing and managing postoperative pain. The American Pain Society, with input from the American Society of Anesthesiologists, commissioned an interdisciplinary expert panel to develop a clinical practice guideline to promote evidence-based, effective, and safer postoperative pain management in children and adults. The guideline was subsequently approved by the American Society for Regional Anesthesia. As part of the guideline development process, a systematic review was commissioned on various aspects related to various interventions and management strategies for postoperative pain. After a review of the evidence, the expert panel formulated recommendations that addressed various aspects of postoperative pain management, including preoperative education, perioperative pain management planning, use of different pharmacological and nonpharmacological modalities, organizational policies, and transition to outpatient care. The recommendations are based on the underlying premise that optimal management begins in the preoperative period with an assessment of the patient and development of a plan of care tailored to the individual and the surgical procedure involved. The panel found that evidence supports the use of multimodal regimens in many situations, although the exact components of effective multimodal care will vary depending on the patient, setting, and surgical procedure. Although these guidelines are based on a systematic review of the evidence on management of postoperative pain, the panel identified numerous research gaps. Of 32 recommendations, 4 were assessed as being supported by high-quality evidence, and 11 (in the areas of patient education and perioperative planning, patient assessment, organizational structures and policies, and transitioning to outpatient care) were made on the basis of low-quality evidence.
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            Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) and organ damage: a current perspective

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              Is Open Access

              Poorly controlled postoperative pain: prevalence, consequences, and prevention

              Tong Gan (2017)
              This review provides an overview of the clinical issue of poorly controlled postoperative pain and therapeutic approaches that may help to address this common unresolved health-care challenge. Postoperative pain is not adequately managed in greater than 80% of patients in the US, although rates vary depending on such factors as type of surgery performed, analgesic/anesthetic intervention used, and time elapsed after surgery. Poorly controlled acute postoperative pain is associated with increased morbidity, functional and quality-of-life impairment, delayed recovery time, prolonged duration of opioid use, and higher health-care costs. In addition, the presence and intensity of acute pain during or after surgery is predictive of the development of chronic pain. More effective analgesic/anesthetic measures in the perioperative period are needed to prevent the progression to persistent pain. Although clinical findings are inconsistent, some studies of local anesthetics and nonopioid analgesics have suggested potential benefits as preventive interventions. Conventional opioids remain the standard of care for the management of acute postoperative pain; however, the risk of opioid-related adverse events can limit optimal dosing for analgesia, leading to poorly controlled acute postoperative pain. Several new opioids have been developed that modulate μ-receptor activity by selectively engaging intracellular pathways associated with analgesia and not those associated with adverse events, creating a wider therapeutic window than unselective conventional opioids. In clinical studies, oliceridine (TRV130), a novel μ-receptor G-protein pathway-selective modulator, produced rapid postoperative analgesia with reduced prevalence of adverse events versus morphine.
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                Author and article information

                Journal
                Pain Management
                Pain Management
                Future Medicine Ltd
                1758-1869
                1758-1877
                May 2021
                May 2021
                : 11
                : 3
                : 249-258
                Affiliations
                [1 ]University Orthopedic & Joint Replacement Center, Tamarac, FL 33321, USA
                [2 ]Baudax Bio Inc., Malvern, PA 19355, USA
                Article
                10.2217/pmt-2020-0082
                2dc2394e-3dfa-4f30-8704-e117a8b2d01b
                © 2021
                History

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