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      Canadian Adolescents’ Experiences of Dating Violence: Associations with Social Power Imbalances

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          Abstract

          A substantial minority of adolescents experience and use dating violence in their sexual and/or romantic relationships. Limited attention has been paid to exploring theory-driven questions about use and experience of adolescent dating violence (ADV), restricting knowledge about promising prevention targets for diverse groups of youth. To address this gap, this paper investigates whether factors tied to power imbalances (bullying, risk of social marginalization) are associated with patterns of ADV victimization and perpetration in a large sample of Canadian mid-adolescents. We used data from the 2017/2018 Health-Behavior in School-Aged Children (HBSC) study, a nationally representative sample of Canadian youth. Our study was comprised of adolescents who were in grades 9 or 10, and who had dated in the past 12 months (N = 3779). We assessed multiple forms of ADV and bullying victimization and perpetration. We also included six variables assessing adolescents’ risk of social marginalization: gender, race/ethnicity, immigration status, family structure, food insecurity, and family affluence. We used latent class analysis to explore the ways adolescents experience and use different forms of ADV, and then examined whether factors tied to power imbalances (bullying, social marginalization) were associated with classes of ADV. Three ADV classes emerged in our sample: uninvolved (65.7%), psychological and cyber victimization only (28.9%), and mutual violence (5.4%). Bullying was most strongly associated with the mutual violence class, suggesting a transformation of power from peer to romantic contexts. Social marginalization variables were associated with ADV patterns in different ways, highlighting the need to use a critical and anti-oppressive lens in ADV research and prevention initiatives.

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          Most cited references63

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          Mapping the Margins: Intersectionality, Identity Politics, and Violence against Women of Color

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            The dual systems model: Review, reappraisal, and reaffirmation

            Highlights • Evidence related to the dual systems model of adolescent risk taking is reviewed. • The review encompasses both the psychological and neuroimaging literatures. • Recent findings (since 2008) generally support the dual systems model. • Recommendations are made for future research directions.
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              Longitudinal associations between teen dating violence victimization and adverse health outcomes.

              To determine the longitudinal association between teen dating violence victimization and selected adverse health outcomes.
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                Author and article information

                Journal
                J Interpers Violence
                J Interpers Violence
                spjiv
                JIV
                Journal of Interpersonal Violence
                SAGE Publications (Sage CA: Los Angeles, CA )
                0886-2605
                1552-6518
                20 May 2022
                January 2022
                : 38
                : 1-2
                : NP1762-NP1786
                Affiliations
                [1 ]Department of Psychology, Ringgold 2129, universityFaculty of Arts, University of Calgary; , Calgary, AB, Canada
                [2 ]Psychology Department, Ringgold 4257, universityQueen’s University; , Kingston, ON, Canada
                Author notes
                [*]Deinera Exner-Cortens, University of Calgary, Department of Psychology, 2500 University Drive NW, Calgary AB, T2N 1N4, Canada. Email: deinera.exner2@ 123456ucalgary.ca
                Author information
                https://orcid.org/0000-0003-2021-1350
                https://orcid.org/0000-0002-4769-2695
                https://orcid.org/0000-0001-8374-5152
                Article
                10.1177_08862605221092072
                10.1177/08862605221092072
                9709543
                35593320
                2e377783-caff-4470-8485-672bd2608bde
                © The Author(s) 2022

                This article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 License ( https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/) which permits non-commercial use, reproduction and distribution of the work without further permission provided the original work is attributed as specified on the SAGE and Open Access page ( https://us.sagepub.com/en-us/nam/open-access-at-sage).

                History
                Funding
                Funded by: Public Health Agency of Canada, FundRef https://doi.org/10.13039/100011094;
                Award ID: 6D016-123071/001/SS
                Categories
                Original Articles
                Custom metadata
                ts10

                dating violence,bullying,adolescent,social marginalization,power

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