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      Prevalence of Self-Reported Chronic Diseases and Health Services Utilization by Ethnic Minorities in Manaus Metropolitan Region

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          Abstract

          Objectives

          To assess the prevalence of, and associated factors to, self-reported chronic diseases and health care utilization by ethnicity in the Manaus Metropolitan Region.

          Methods

          We conducted a cross-sectional, population-based survey from May through August 2015. Using probabilistic sampling in three stages, we recruited adults aged ≥18 years. Ethnicity was self-identified as White, Black, Yellow, Brown (Brazilian mixed-race), and Indigenous. We calculated adjusted prevalence ratios (PR) and 95% CI of chronic diseases and health service utilization for each ethnic minority and compared the data using Poisson regression with data from White respondents.

          Results

          In this study, we interviewed 4,001 people. Of these, 15.9% were White, 7.5% Black, 3.4% Yellow, 72.1% Brown, and 1.0% Indigenous. Indigenous respondents had the highest prevalence of self-reported hypertension (29.4%), diabetes (12.3%) and hypercholesterolemia (17.0%) among the ethnic respondent groups. Compared with the White population, Browns had less health insurance coverage (PR=.76; 95% CI: .62-.93) and reported hypertension (PR=.84; 95% CI: .72-0.98) and diabetes (PR=.69; 95% CI: .51-.94) less frequently. Yellows visited the doctor more frequently than Whites (PR=1.13; 95% CI: 1.04-1.22), with no significant difference in prevalence of diseases.

          Conclusions

          Indigenous respondents had higher prevalence rates of the investigated diseases. Compared with Whites, Brown respondents had lower rates of self-reported arterial hypertension and diabetes, as well as lower rates of private health insurance coverage.

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          Author and article information

          Journal
          Ethn Dis
          Ethn Dis
          Ethn Dis
          Ethn Dis
          Ethnicity & Disease
          International Society on Hypertension in Blacks
          1049-510X
          1945-0826
          1 February 2018
          Winter 2018
          : 28
          : 1 , Workforce Strengthening, Winter 2018
          : 49-54
          Affiliations
          [1]Federal University of Amazonas. College of Medicine, Manaus, Brazil
          [2]University of Campinas, Faculty of Pharmaceutical Science, Campinas, Brazil
          Author notes
          Address correspondence to Marcus Tolentino Silva, PhD; Professor, Federal University of Amazonas. Faculty of Medicine, Manaus, Brazil; +55 19 991496 311; marcusts@gmail.com

          Competing Interests: None declared.

          Research concept and design: Galvao, Silva; Acquisition of data: Galvao, Silva; Data analysis and interpretation: Alencar, Antonio, Silva; Manuscript draft: Alencar, Galvao, Silva; Statistical expertise: Silva; Acquisition of funding: Silva; Administrative: Alencar, Antonio; Supervision: Galvao, Silva

          Article
          PMC5794448 PMC5794448 5794448 ed.28.1.49
          10.18865/ed.28.1.49
          5794448
          29467566
          2e8ca66c-2038-461e-bb3b-ea64176d710b
          Copyright © 2018, International Society on Hypertension in Blacks.
          Categories
          Original Report: Chronic Diseases

          Health Services,Brazil,Chronic Disease,Ethnic Groups,Surveys,Cross-Sectional Studies

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