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      Longitudinal Examination of the Bullying-Sexual Violence Pathway across Early to Late Adolescence: Implicating Homophobic Name-Calling

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          Abstract

          <p class="first" id="P1">The <i>Bully-Sexual Violence Pathway</i> theory has indicated that bullying perpetration predicts sexual violence perpetration among males and females over time in middle school, and that homophobic name-calling perpetration moderates that association among males. In this study, the <i>Bully-Sexual Violence Pathway</i> theory was tested across early to late adolescence. Participants included 3549 students from four Midwestern middle schools and six high schools. Surveys were administered across six time points from Spring 2008 to Spring 2013. At baseline, the sample was 32.2% White, 46.2% African American, 5.4% Hispanic, and 10.2% other. The sample was 50.2% female. The findings reveal that late middle school homophobic name-calling perpetration increased the odds of perpetrating sexual violence in high school among early middle school bullying male and female perpetrators, while homophobic name-calling victimization decreased the odds of high school sexual violence perpetration among females. The prevention of bullying and homophobic name-calling in middle school may prevent later sexual violence perpetration. </p>

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          Most cited references32

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          Bullying Behaviors Among US Youth

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            The Psychology of Sexual Prejudice

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              Personal and interpersonal antecedents and consequences of victimization by peers.

              This study was designed to determine whether the personal and interpersonal difficulties that characterize victimized children are antecedents of victimization, consequences of victimization, or both. Boys and girls in the 3rd through 7th grades (N = 173, mean age = 11.3 years) were assessed on victimization, personal variables (internalizing problems, externalizing problems, and physical strength), and interpersonal variables (number of friends and peer rejection). One year later children were assessed again on all variables. Internalizing problems, physical weakness, and peer rejection contributed uniquely to gains in victimization over time. Moreover, initial victimization predicted increases in later internalizing symptoms and peer rejection. These reciprocal influences suggest the existence of a vicious cycle that supports the strong temporal stability of peer victimization.
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                Author and article information

                Journal
                Journal of Youth and Adolescence
                J Youth Adolescence
                Springer Nature
                0047-2891
                1573-6601
                March 2 2018
                Article
                10.1007/s10964-018-0827-4
                6098975
                29500577
                2eab690e-f255-48c3-9ec7-4af370410403
                © 2018

                http://www.springer.com/tdm

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