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      Symbiotic bacteria direct expression of an intestinal bactericidal lectin.

      Science (New York, N.Y.)

      Animals, Antigens, Neoplasm, metabolism, pharmacology, Bacteria, growth & development, immunology, Chitin, Colony Count, Microbial, Germ-Free Life, Gram-Positive Bacteria, Homeostasis, Humans, Immunity, Innate, Immunity, Mucosal, Intestine, Small, microbiology, Lectins, C-Type, Ligands, Listeria monocytogenes, ultrastructure, Mice, Oligonucleotide Array Sequence Analysis, Paneth Cells, Peptidoglycan, chemistry, Protein Structure, Tertiary, Proteins, genetics, Recombinant Proteins, Secretory Vesicles, Symbiosis, Tumor Markers, Biological

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          Abstract

          The mammalian intestine harbors complex societies of beneficial bacteria that are maintained in the lumen with minimal penetration of mucosal surfaces. Microbial colonization of germ-free mice triggers epithelial expression of RegIIIgamma, a secreted C-type lectin. RegIIIgamma binds intestinal bacteria but lacks the complement recruitment domains present in other microbe-binding mammalian C-type lectins. We show that RegIIIgamma and its human counterpart, HIP/PAP, are directly antimicrobial proteins that bind their bacterial targets via interactions with peptidoglycan carbohydrate. We propose that these proteins represent an evolutionarily primitive form of lectin-mediated innate immunity, and that they reveal intestinal strategies for maintaining symbiotic host-microbial relationships.

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          Author and article information

          Journal
          16931762
          2716667
          10.1126/science.1127119

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