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      • Record: found
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      Intravenous Iron: The Iatrogenic Kick to Lose Control over Oxygen?

      ,

      Kidney and Blood Pressure Research

      S. Karger AG

      Chronic kidney failure, Iron, Oxidative stress

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          Abstract

          Effective erythropoiesis requires both erythropoietin and iron. Regular, intravenous iron supplements represent a standard adjuvant therapy for the treatment of anemia of chronic kidney disease. In this paper, the authors speculate upon potential deleterious effects of intravenous iron on cellular physiology in the setting of the increased oxidant burden of hemodialysis patients.

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          Most cited references 10

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          The evolution of free radicals and oxidative stress.

           Joe M. McCord (2000)
          The superoxide free radical has come to occupy an amazingly central role in a wide variety of diseases. Our metabolic focus on aerobic energy metabolism in all cell types, coupled with some chemical peculiarities of the oxygen molecule itself, contribute to the phenomenon. Superoxide is not, as we once thought, just a toxic but unavoidable byproduct of oxygen metabolism. Rather it appears to be a carefully regulated metabolite capable of signaling and communicating important information to the cell's genetic machinery. Redox regulation of gene expression by superoxide and other related oxidants and antioxidants is beginning to unfold as a vital mechanism in health and disease.
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            Regulation of gene expression by reactive oxygen.

            Reactive oxygen intermediates are produced in all aerobic organisms during respiration and exist in the cell in a balance with biochemical antioxidants. Excess reactive oxygen resulting from exposure to environmental oxidants, toxicants, and heavy metals perturbs cellular redox balance and disrupts normal biological functions. The resulting imbalance may be detrimental to the organism and contribute to the pathogenesis of disease and aging. To counteract the oxidant effects and to restore a state of redox balance, cells must reset critical homeostatic parameters. Changes associated with oxidative damage and with restoration of cellular homeostasis often lead to activation or silencing of genes encoding regulatory transcription factors, antioxidant defense enzymes, and structural proteins. In this review, we examine the sources and generation of free radicals and oxidative stress in biological systems and the mechanisms used by reactive oxygen to modulate signal transduction cascades and redirect gene expression.
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              • Record: found
              • Abstract: not found
              • Article: not found

              Glutathione antioxidant system as a marker of oxidative stress in chronic renal failure

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                Author and article information

                Journal
                KBR
                Kidney Blood Press Res
                10.1159/issn.1420-4096
                Kidney and Blood Pressure Research
                S. Karger AG
                1420-4096
                1423-0143
                2002
                2002
                28 November 2002
                : 25
                : 5
                : 284-288
                Affiliations
                Universitätsklinik für Innere Medizin III, Klinische Abteilung für Nephrologie und Dialyse, Wien, Österreich
                Article
                66793 Kidney Blood Press Res 2002;25:284–288
                10.1159/000066793
                12435873
                © 2002 S. Karger AG, Basel

                Copyright: All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be translated into other languages, reproduced or utilized in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopying, recording, microcopying, or by any information storage and retrieval system, without permission in writing from the publisher. Drug Dosage: The authors and the publisher have exerted every effort to ensure that drug selection and dosage set forth in this text are in accord with current recommendations and practice at the time of publication. However, in view of ongoing research, changes in government regulations, and the constant flow of information relating to drug therapy and drug reactions, the reader is urged to check the package insert for each drug for any changes in indications and dosage and for added warnings and precautions. This is particularly important when the recommended agent is a new and/or infrequently employed drug. Disclaimer: The statements, opinions and data contained in this publication are solely those of the individual authors and contributors and not of the publishers and the editor(s). The appearance of advertisements or/and product references in the publication is not a warranty, endorsement, or approval of the products or services advertised or of their effectiveness, quality or safety. The publisher and the editor(s) disclaim responsibility for any injury to persons or property resulting from any ideas, methods, instructions or products referred to in the content or advertisements.

                Page count
                References: 51, Pages: 5
                Product
                Self URI (application/pdf): https://www.karger.com/Article/Pdf/66793
                Categories
                Review

                Cardiovascular Medicine, Nephrology

                Iron, Oxidative stress, Chronic kidney failure

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