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      Aortic Arch Pulse Wave Velocity Assessed by Magnetic Resonance Imaging as a Predictor of Incident Cardiovascular Events: The MESA (Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis).

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          Abstract

          The predictive value of aortic arch pulse wave velocity (PWV) assessed by magnetic resonance imaging for cardiovascular disease (CVD) events has not been fully established. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the association of arch PWV with incident CVD events in MESA (Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis). Aortic arch PWV was measured using magnetic resonance imaging at baseline in 3527 MESA participants (mean age, 62±10 years at baseline; 47% men) free of overt CVD. Cox regression was used to evaluate the risk of incident CVD (coronary heart disease, stroke, transient ischemic attack, or heart failure) in relation to arch PWV adjusted for age, sex, race, and CVD risk factors. The median value of arch PWV was 7.4 m/s (interquartile range, 5.6-10.2). There was significant interaction between arch PWV and age for outcomes, so analysis was stratified by age categories (45-54 and >54 years). There were 456 CVD events during the 10-year follow-up. Forty-five to 54-year-old participants had significant association of arch PWV with incident CVD independent of CVD risk factors (hazard ratio, 1.44; 95% confidence interval, 1.07-1.95; P=0.018; per 1-SD increase for logarithmically transformed PWV), whereas >54-year group did not (P=0.93). Aortic arch PWV assessed by magnetic resonance imaging is a significant predictor of CVD events among middle-aged (45-54 years old) individuals, whereas arch PWV is not associated with CVD among an elderly in a large multiethnic population.

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          Author and article information

          Journal
          Hypertension
          Hypertension (Dallas, Tex. : 1979)
          Ovid Technologies (Wolters Kluwer Health)
          1524-4563
          0194-911X
          September 2017
          : 70
          : 3
          Affiliations
          [1 ] From the Department of Cardiology (Y.O., C.N., J.-Y.K., Y.T., G.T.-T., A.R.C., J.A.C.L.), Department of Radiology (B.A.-V.), and Department of Epidemiology (E.G.), Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD; Imagerie Cardiovasculaire/Department of Cardiovascular Imaging DICVRI, Institut de Cardiologie, Groupe Hospitalier Pitié Salpêtrière, Paris (A.R.); Radiology and Imaging Sciences, National Institutes of Health Clinical Center, Bethesda, MD (C.-Y.L., D.A.B.); Office of Biostatistics Research, National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, Bethesda, MD (C.O.W.); and Department of Epidemiology and Prevention, Wake Forest School of Medicine, Winston-Salem, NC (W.G.H.).
          [2 ] From the Department of Cardiology (Y.O., C.N., J.-Y.K., Y.T., G.T.-T., A.R.C., J.A.C.L.), Department of Radiology (B.A.-V.), and Department of Epidemiology (E.G.), Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD; Imagerie Cardiovasculaire/Department of Cardiovascular Imaging DICVRI, Institut de Cardiologie, Groupe Hospitalier Pitié Salpêtrière, Paris (A.R.); Radiology and Imaging Sciences, National Institutes of Health Clinical Center, Bethesda, MD (C.-Y.L., D.A.B.); Office of Biostatistics Research, National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, Bethesda, MD (C.O.W.); and Department of Epidemiology and Prevention, Wake Forest School of Medicine, Winston-Salem, NC (W.G.H.). jlima@jhmi.edu.
          Article
          HYPERTENSIONAHA.116.08749 NIHMS882205
          10.1161/HYPERTENSIONAHA.116.08749
          5612667
          28674039

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