Blog
About

1
views
0
recommends
+1 Recommend
0 collections
    0
    shares
      • Record: found
      • Abstract: found
      • Article: not found

      Technical standards for respiratory oscillometry

      Read this article at

      ScienceOpenPublisher
      Bookmark
          There is no author summary for this article yet. Authors can add summaries to their articles on ScienceOpen to make them more accessible to a non-specialist audience.

          Abstract

          Oscillometry (also known as the forced oscillation technique) measures the mechanical properties of the respiratory system (upper and intrathoracic airways, lung tissue and chest wall) during quiet tidal breathing, by the application of an oscillating pressure signal (input or forcing signal), most commonly at the mouth. With increased clinical and research use, it is critical that all technical details of the hardware design, signal processing and analyses, and testing protocols are transparent and clearly reported to allow standardisation, comparison and replication of clinical and research studies. Because of this need, an update of the 2003 European Respiratory Society (ERS) technical standards document was produced by an ERS task force of experts who are active in clinical oscillometry research.

          The aim of the task force was to provide technical recommendations regarding oscillometry measurement including hardware, software, testing protocols and quality control.

          The main changes in this update, compared with the 2003 ERS task force document are 1) new quality control procedures which reflect use of “within-breath” analysis, and methods of handling artefacts; 2) recommendation to disclose signal processing, quality control, artefact handling and breathing protocols ( e.g. number and duration of acquisitions) in reports and publications to allow comparability and replication between devices and laboratories; 3) a summary review of new data to support threshold values for bronchodilator and bronchial challenge tests; and 4) updated list of predicted impedance values in adults and children.

          Related collections

          Most cited references 131

          • Record: found
          • Abstract: not found
          • Article: not found

          Evaporated Sn-doped In2O3 films: Basic optical properties and applications to energy-efficient windows

            Bookmark
            • Record: found
            • Abstract: not found
            • Article: not found

            The forced oscillation technique in clinical practice: methodology, recommendations and future developments

              Bookmark
              • Record: found
              • Abstract: found
              • Article: not found

              Detection of expiratory flow limitation in COPD using the forced oscillation technique.

              Expiratory flow limitation (EFL) during tidal breathing is a major determinant of dynamic hyperinflation and exercise limitation in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Current methods of detecting this are either invasive or unsuited to following changes breath-by-breath. It was hypothesised that tidal flow limitation would substantially reduce the total respiratory system reactance (Xrs) during expiration, and that this reduction could be used to reliably detect if EFL was present. To test this, 5-Hz forced oscillations were applied at the mouth in seven healthy subjects and 15 COPD patients (mean +/- sD forced expiratory volume in one second was 36.8 +/- 11.5% predicted) during quiet breathing. COPD breaths were analysed (n=206) and classified as flow-limited if flow decreased as alveolar pressure increased, indeterminate if flow decreased at constant alveolar pressure, or nonflow-limited. Of these, 85 breaths were flow-limited, 80 were not and 41 were indeterminate. Among other indices, mean inspiratory minus mean expiratory Xrs (deltaXrs) and minimum expiratory Xrs (Xexp,min) identified flow-limited breaths with 100% specificity and sensitivity using a threshold between 2.53-3.12 cmH2O x s x L(-1) (deltaXrs) and -7.38- -6.76 cmH2O x s x L(-1) (Xexp,min) representing 6.0% and 3.9% of the total range of values respectively. No flow-limited breaths were seen in the normal subjects by either method. Within-breath respiratory system reactance provides an accurate, reliable and noninvasive technique to detect expiratory flow limitation in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.
                Bookmark

                Author and article information

                Journal
                European Respiratory Journal
                Eur Respir J
                European Respiratory Society (ERS)
                0903-1936
                1399-3003
                February 27 2020
                February 2020
                February 2020
                November 26 2019
                : 55
                : 2
                : 1900753
                Article
                10.1183/13993003.00753-2019
                © 2019

                Comments

                Comment on this article