5
views
0
recommends
+1 Recommend
0 collections
    0
    shares
      • Record: found
      • Abstract: found
      • Article: not found

      Early Childhood Trajectories of Conduct Problems and Callous-Unemotional Traits: The Role of Fearlessness and Psychopathic Personality Dimensions.

      Read this article at

      ScienceOpenPublisherPubMed
      Bookmark
          There is no author summary for this article yet. Authors can add summaries to their articles on ScienceOpen to make them more accessible to a non-specialist audience.

          Abstract

          Children with early onset of conduct problems (CP) are at risk for long lasting psychosocial problems, especially if CP co-occurs with callous-unemotional (CU) traits. Joint trajectories of CP and CU traits during early childhood were identified using data from the SOFIA study, following 2031 children longitudinally from ages 3-5 to 5-7 years. The results showed that children exhibiting stable high CP and CU traits were characterized by high levels of fearlessness, and psychopathic traits, including grandiose-deceitfulness, and impulsivity, need for stimulation. Children with decreasing or increasing CP and CU traits were characterized by decreases and increases respectively in their levels of fearlessness and psychopathic traits. Children high on CP and low on CU traits exhibited lower levels of these dimensions. Thus, stability and change of fearlessness and psychopathic traits are associated with stability and change in CP and CU traits, making these temperamental and personality traits promising target candidates for early intervention.

          Related collections

          Author and article information

          Journal
          Child Psychiatry Hum Dev
          Child psychiatry and human development
          Springer Nature
          1573-3327
          0009-398X
          Apr 2016
          : 47
          : 2
          Affiliations
          [1 ] School of Law, Psychology and Social Work, Örebro University, 701 82, Örebro, Sweden. ida.klingzell@oru.se.
          [2 ] Department of Psychology, University of Cyprus, Nicosia, Cyprus.
          [3 ] School of Law, Psychology and Social Work, Örebro University, 701 82, Örebro, Sweden.
          [4 ] Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Curium-Leiden University Medical Center, Leiden, The Netherlands.
          Article
          10.1007/s10578-015-0560-0
          10.1007/s10578-015-0560-0
          26115696
          2f51785c-6c0f-44c7-ab5a-44e0740ebec9

          Comments

          Comment on this article