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      Beyond Primary Prevention of Alcohol Use: A Culturally Specific Secondary Prevention Program for Mexican Heritage Adolescents

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          Abstract

          Classroom-based primary prevention programs with adolescents are effective in inhibiting the onset of drug use, but these programs are not designed to directly address the unique needs of adolescents at higher risk of use or already using alcohol and other drugs. This article describes the initial efficacy evaluation of a companion psychosocial small group program which aims at addressing the needs of Mexican heritage students identified by their teachers as being at higher risk for substance use or already experimenting with alcohol and other drugs. The adolescent (7th grade) small group curricula, REAL Groups, is a secondary prevention program which supplements the primary classroom-based substance use prevention program, keepin’ it REAL. Following a mutual aid approach, a total of 109 7th grade students were referred by their teachers and participated in the REAL Groups. The remaining 252 7th grade students who did not participate served as the control group. To account for biased selection into REAL Groups, propensity score matching (PSM) was employed. The estimated average treatment effect for participants’ use of alcohol was calculated at the end of the 8th grade. Results indicate that alcohol use decreased among students who participated in the REAL Groups relative to matched students who did not participate. These findings suggest that REAL Groups may be an effective secondary prevention program for higher-risk Mexican heritage adolescents.

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          Author and article information

          Contributors
          Journal
          100894724
          22453
          Prev Sci
          Prev Sci
          Prevention Science
          1389-4986
          1573-6695
          29 June 2012
          June 2012
          01 June 2013
          : 13
          : 3
          : 241-251
          Affiliations
          Southwest Interdisciplinary Research Center, Arizona State University, 411 North Central Avenue, Suite 720, Phoenix, AZ 85004, USA. School of Social Work, College of Public Programs, Arizona State University, Phoenix, AZ, USA
          Southwest Interdisciplinary Research Center, Arizona State University, 411 North Central Avenue, Suite 720, Phoenix, AZ 85004, USA
          Southwest Interdisciplinary Research Center, Arizona State University, 411 North Central Avenue, Suite 720, Phoenix, AZ 85004, USA. College of Nursing and Health Innovation, Arizona State University, Phoenix, AZ, USA
          Southwest Interdisciplinary Research Center, Arizona State University, 411 North Central Avenue, Suite 720, Phoenix, AZ 85004, USA. Paradise Valley School District, Phoenix, AZ, USA
          Southwest Interdisciplinary Research Center, Arizona State University, 411 North Central Avenue, Suite 720, Phoenix, AZ 85004, USA. School of Social Work, College of Public Programs, Arizona State University, Phoenix, AZ, USA
          Article
          PMC3401063 PMC3401063 3401063 nihpa387077
          10.1007/s11121-011-0263-0
          3401063
          22193861
          2f718c2e-7276-4e80-8d32-e6cc9e280ef1
          © Society for Prevention Research 2011
          History
          Funding
          Funded by: National Institute on Drug Abuse : NIDA
          Award ID: R01 DA005629 || DA
          Funded by: National Center on Minority Health and Health Disparities : NIMHD
          Award ID: P20 MD002316 || MD
          Categories
          Article

          Substance use,Propensity score matching, keepin’ it REAL ,Secondary prevention program

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