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      Symptomatic Intracerebral Hemorrhage following Thrombolytic Therapy for Acute Ischemic Stroke: A Review of the Risk Factors

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          Abstract

          Background: Symptomatic intracerebral hemorrhage (SICH) following thrombolytic therapy for acute ischemic stroke is associated with a high rate of morbidity and mortality. Knowledge of the risk factors associated with SICH following thrombolyitc therapy may provide insight into the pathophysiological mechanisms underlying the development of SICH, lead to the development of treatments that reduce the risk of SICH and have implications for the design of future stroke trials. Methods: Relevant studies were identified through a search in Pubmed. Included studies used multivariate analyses to identify independent risk factors for SICH following thrombolytic therapy. For each variable that was found to have a significant association with SICH, a secondary literature search was conducted to identify additional reports on the specific relationship between that variable and SICH. Summary of Review: Twelve studies met inclusion criteria for the systematic review. Extent of hypoattenuated brain parenchyma on pretreatment CT and elevated serum glucose or history of diabetes were independent risk factors for thrombolysis-associated SICH in six of the twelve studies. Symptom severity was an independent risk factor in three of the studies and advanced age, increased time to treatment, high systolic blood pressure, low platelets, history of congestive heart failure and low plasminogen activator inhibitor levels were found to be independent risk factors for SICH in a single study. Although these data should not alter the current guidelines for the use of rt-PA in acute stroke, they may help develop future strategies aimed at reducing the rate of thrombolysis-associated SICH.

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          Most cited references 38

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          Metalloproteinases and their inhibitors in matrix remodeling.

          The matrix metalloproteinases are a tightly regulated family of enzymes that degrade extracellular matrix and basement membrane components. Recent evidence suggests that these proteases and their specific inhibitors play important roles in normal developmental processes and in pathological conditions. Interestingly, experiments designed to improve our understanding of metalloproteinase regulation have also resulted in new insights into mechanisms by which growth factors and proto-oncogenes may regulate biological processes.
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            The Desmoteplase in Acute Ischemic Stroke Trial (DIAS): a phase II MRI-based 9-hour window acute stroke thrombolysis trial with intravenous desmoteplase.

            Most acute ischemic stroke patients arrive after the 3-hour time window for recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (rtPA) administration. The Desmoteplase In Acute Ischemic Stroke trial (DIAS) was a dose-finding randomized trial designed to evaluate the safety and efficacy of intravenous desmoteplase, a highly fibrin-specific and nonneurotoxic thrombolytic agent, administered within 3 to 9 hours of ischemic stroke onset in patients with perfusion/diffusion mismatch on MRI. DIAS was a placebo-controlled, double-blind, randomized, dose-finding phase II trial. Patients with National Institute of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) scores of 4 to 20 and MRI evidence of perfusion/diffusion mismatch were eligible. Of 104 patients, the first 47 (referred to as Part 1) were randomized to fixed doses of desmoteplase (25 mg, 37.5 mg, or 50 mg) or placebo. Because of an excessive rate of symptomatic intracranial hemorrhage (sICH), lower weight-adjusted doses escalating through 62.5 microg/kg, 90 microg/kg, and 125 microg/kg were subsequently investigated in 57 patients (referred to as Part 2). The safety endpoint was the rate of sICH. Efficacy endpoints were the rate of reperfusion on MRI after 4 to 8 hours and clinical outcome as assessed by NIHSS, modified Rankin scale, and Barthel Index at 90 days. Part 1 was terminated prematurely because of high rates of sICH with desmoteplase (26.7%). In Part 2, the sICH rate was 2.2%. No sICH occurred with placebo in either part. Reperfusion rates up to 71.4% (P=0.0012) were observed with desmoteplase (125 microg/kg) compared with 19.2% with placebo. Favorable 90-day clinical outcome was found in 22.2% of placebo-treated patients and between 13.3% (62.5 microg/kg; P=0.757) and 60.0% (125 microg/kg; P=0.0090) of desmoteplase-treated patients. Early reperfusion correlated favorably with clinical outcome (P=0.0028). Favorable outcome occurred in 52.5% of patients experiencing reperfusion versus 24.6% of patients without reperfusion. Intravenous desmoteplase administered 3 to 9 hours after acute ischemic stroke in patients selected with perfusion/diffusion mismatch is associated with a higher rate of reperfusion and better clinical outcome compared with placebo. The sICH rate with desmoteplase was low, using doses up to 125 microg/kg.
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              Guidelines for the early management of patients with ischemic stroke: A scientific statement from the Stroke Council of the American Stroke Association.

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                Author and article information

                Journal
                CED
                Cerebrovasc Dis
                10.1159/issn.1015-9770
                Cerebrovascular Diseases
                S. Karger AG
                1015-9770
                1421-9786
                2007
                June 2007
                22 May 2007
                : 24
                : 1
                : 1-10
                Affiliations
                Stanford University, Stanford Stroke Center, Palo Alto, Calif., USA
                Article
                103110 Cerebrovasc Dis 2007;24:1–10
                10.1159/000103110
                17519538
                © 2007 S. Karger AG, Basel

                Copyright: All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be translated into other languages, reproduced or utilized in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopying, recording, microcopying, or by any information storage and retrieval system, without permission in writing from the publisher. Drug Dosage: The authors and the publisher have exerted every effort to ensure that drug selection and dosage set forth in this text are in accord with current recommendations and practice at the time of publication. However, in view of ongoing research, changes in government regulations, and the constant flow of information relating to drug therapy and drug reactions, the reader is urged to check the package insert for each drug for any changes in indications and dosage and for added warnings and precautions. This is particularly important when the recommended agent is a new and/or infrequently employed drug. Disclaimer: The statements, opinions and data contained in this publication are solely those of the individual authors and contributors and not of the publishers and the editor(s). The appearance of advertisements or/and product references in the publication is not a warranty, endorsement, or approval of the products or services advertised or of their effectiveness, quality or safety. The publisher and the editor(s) disclaim responsibility for any injury to persons or property resulting from any ideas, methods, instructions or products referred to in the content or advertisements.

                Page count
                Tables: 2, References: 70, Pages: 10
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