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      Validation of a Brief Pornography Screen across multiple samples

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          Abstract

          Background and Aims

          To address current gaps around screening for problematic pornography use (PPU), we initially developed and tested a six-item Brief Pornography Screen (BPS) that asked about PPU in the past six months.

          Methods and Participants

          We recruited five independent samples from the U.S. and Poland to evaluate the psychometric properties of the BPS. In Study 1, we evaluated the factor structure, reliability, and elements of validity using a sample of 224 U.S. veterans. One item from the BPS was dropped in Study 1 due to low item endorsement. In Studies 2 and 3, we further investigated the five-item the factor structure of the BPS and evaluated its reliability and validity in two national U.S. representative samples ( N = 1,466, N = 1,063, respectively). In Study 4, we confirmed the factor structure and evaluated its validity and reliability using a sample of 703 Polish adults. In Study 5, we calculated the suggested cut-off score for the screen using a sample of 105 male patients seeking treatment for compulsive sexual behavior disorder (CSBD).

          Results

          Findings from a principal components analysis and confirmatory factor analysis supported a one-factor solution which yielded high internal consistency ( α = 0.89–0.90), and analyses further supported elements of construct, convergent, criterion, and discriminant validity of the newly developed screen. Results from a Receiver Operating Characteristic (ROC) curve suggested a cut-off score of four or higher for detecting possible PPU.

          Conclusions

          The BPS appears to be psychometrically sound, short, and easy to use in various settings with high potential for use in populations across international jurisdictions.

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          Author and article information

          Contributors
          Journal
          2006
          Journal of Behavioral Addictions
          J Behav Addict
          Akadémiai Kiadó (Budapest )
          2062-5871
          2063-5303
          June 2020
          07 July 2020
          : 9
          : 2
          : 259-271
          Affiliations
          [1 ] deptDepartment of Psychology , University of Nevada, Las Vegas, Las Vegas, NV, USA
          [2 ] deptInstitute of Psychology , Polish Academy of Sciences, Warsaw, Poland
          [3 ] deptSwartz Center for Computational Neuroscience, Institute for Neural Computations , University of California San Diego, San Diego, CA, USA
          [4 ] deptDepartment of Psychology , Bowling Green State University, Bowling Green, OH, USA
          [5 ] deptDepartment of Psychiatry , Centre of Postgraduate Medical Education, Warsaw, Poland
          [6 ] deptDepartment of Psychiatry , Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT, USA
          [7 ] deptNortheast Program Evaluation Center , VA Connecticut Healthcare System, West Haven, CT, USA
          [8 ] deptVISN 1 New England MIRECC, VA Connecticut Healthcare System , West Haven, CT, USA
          [9 ] University of Massachusetts Medical School , Worcester, MA, USA
          [10 ] deptConnecticut Council on Problem Gambling , Wethersfield, CT, USA
          [11 ] deptConnecticut Mental Health Center , New Haven, CT, USA
          [12 ] deptDepartment of Neuroscience and Child Study Center , Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT, USA
          Author notes
          [* ]Corresponding author's e-mail: shane.kraus@ 123456unlv.edu
          Article
          10.1556/2006.2020.00038
          © 2020 The Author(s)

          Open Access statement. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International License ( https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium for non-commercial purposes, provided the original author and source are credited, a link to the CC License is provided, and changes – if any – are indicated.

          Page count
          Figures: 01, Tables: 04, References: 75, Pages: 13
          Funding
          Funded by: Department of Veterans Affairs Office of Research and Development, Clinical Science Research and Development
          Funded by: VISN 1 New England MIRECC
          Funded by: Bowling Green State University
          Funded by: National Science Centre of Poland
          Award ID: 2014/15/B/HS6/03792
          Funded by: Connecticut State Department of Mental Health and Addiction Services
          Funded by: Connecticut Mental Health Center
          Funded by: Connecticut Council on Problem Gambling
          Funded by: National Center for Responsible Gaming
          Categories
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