12
views
0
recommends
+1 Recommend
1 collections
    0
    shares

      To submit to Bentham Journals, please click here

      • Record: found
      • Abstract: found
      • Article: found
      Is Open Access

      Meet the Editorial Board Member

      in-brief
      Current Neuropharmacology
      Bentham Science Publishers

      Read this article at

      Bookmark
          There is no author summary for this article yet. Authors can add summaries to their articles on ScienceOpen to make them more accessible to a non-specialist audience.

          Abstract

          Sari Goldstein Ferber, PhD, is a clinical psychologist trained at the Department of Psychiatry, Harvard University Medical School. In her PhD dissertation, she pioneered innovative neurobehavioral treatments in Neonatal Intensive Care Units in Israel. She is an associate of the highly ranked journal Behavioral and Brain Sciences, with publications in this journal and on The Editorial Board of other High ranked Journals in Psychiatry and Neuroscience. She received the Fulbright New Century Scholar award and is a USA Department of State Alumna. She received many grants, including a US-Israel Bi-National Research Foundation grant. She was a Visiting Professor at Columbia University. She published around 40 scientific articles in highly ranked journals. Her recent publications focus on biological clocks and control systems models.

          Related collections

          Most cited references11

          • Record: found
          • Abstract: found
          • Article: not found

          The effect of skin-to-skin contact (kangaroo care) shortly after birth on the neurobehavioral responses of the term newborn: a randomized, controlled trial.

          The method of skin-to-skin contact (kangaroo care [KC]) has shown physiologic, cognitive, and emotional gains for preterm infants; however, KC has not been studied adequately in term newborns. To evaluate the effect of KC, used shortly after delivery, on the neurobehavioral responses of the healthy newborn. A randomized, controlled trial using a table of random numbers. After consent, the mothers were assigned to 1 of 2 groups: KC shortly after delivery or a no-treatment standard care (control group). Included were 47 healthy mother-infant pairs. KC began at 15 to 20 minutes after delivery and lasted for 1 hour. Control infants and KC infants were brought to the nursery 15 to 20 and 75 to 80 minutes after birth, respectively. During a 1-hour-long observation, starting at 4 hours postnatally, the KC infants slept longer, were mostly in a quiet sleep state, exhibited more flexor movements and postures, and showed less extensor movements. KC seems to influence state organization and motor system modulation of the newborn infant shortly after delivery. The significance of our findings for supportive transition from the womb to the extrauterine environment is discussed. Medical and nursing staff may be well advised to provide this kind of care shortly after birth.
            Bookmark
            • Record: found
            • Abstract: found
            • Article: found
            Is Open Access

            Between Action and Emotional Survival During the COVID-19 era: Sensorimotor Pathways as Control Systems of Transdiagnostic Anxiety-Related Intolerance to Uncertainty

            Objectives: The COVID-19 pandemic and aligned social and physical distancing regulations increase the sense of uncertainty, intensifying the risk for psychopathology globally. Anxiety disorders are associated with intolerance to uncertainty. In this review we describe brain circuits and sensorimotor pathways involved in human reactions to uncertainty. We present the healthy mode of coping with uncertainty and discuss deviations from this mode. Methods: Literature search of PubMed and Google Scholar. Results: As manifestation of anxiety disorders includes peripheral reactions and negative cognitions, we suggest an integrative model of threat cognitions modulated by sensorimotor regions: “The Sensorimotor-Cognitive-Integration-Circuit.” The model emphasizes autonomic nervous system coupling with the cortex, addressing peripheral anxious reactions to uncertainty, pathways connecting cortical regions and cost-reward evaluation circuits to sensorimotor regions, filtered by the amygdala and basal ganglia. Of special interest are the ascending and descending tracts for sensory-motor crosstalk in healthy and pathological conditions. We include arguments regarding uncertainty in anxiety reactions to the pandemic and derive from our model treatment suggestions which are supported by scientific evidence. Our model is based on systematic control theories and emphasizes the role of goal conflict regulation in health and pathology. We also address anxiety reactions as a spectrum ranging from healthy to pathological coping with uncertainty, and present this spectrum as a transdiagnostic entity in accordance with recent claims and models. Conclusions: The human need for controllability and predictability suggests that anxiety disorders reactive to the pandemic's uncertainties reflect pathological disorganization of top-down bottom-up signaling and neural noise resulting from non-pathological human needs for coherence in life.
              Bookmark
              • Record: found
              • Abstract: not found
              • Article: not found

              The concept of coregulation between neurobehavioral subsystems: the logic interplay between excitatory and inhibitory ends

                Bookmark

                Author and article information

                Journal
                Curr Neuropharmacol
                Curr Neuropharmacol
                CN
                Current Neuropharmacology
                Bentham Science Publishers
                1570-159X
                1875-6190
                27 October 2022
                27 October 2022
                : 20
                : 11
                : 2013
                Affiliations
                [1]Department of Psychiatry and Brain Research Center Bar-Ilan University Ramat Gan, Israel
                Article
                CN-20-2013
                10.2174/1570159X2011220919094044
                9886844
                30ffa699-c0ac-4d1d-9fe8-10991dbe5abe
                © 2022 Bentham Science Publishers

                This is an open access article licensed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-Non-Commercial 4.0 International Public License (CC BY-NC 4.0) ( https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/), which permits unrestricted, non-commercial use, distribution and reproduction in any medium, provided the work is properly cited.

                History
                Categories
                Neurology

                Pharmacology & Pharmaceutical medicine
                Pharmacology & Pharmaceutical medicine

                Comments

                Comment on this article