Blog
About

  • Record: found
  • Abstract: not found
  • Article: not found

Biophysical and economic limits to negative CO2 emissions

Read this article at

ScienceOpenPublisher
Bookmark
      There is no author summary for this article yet. Authors can add summaries to their articles on ScienceOpen to make them more accessible to a non-specialist audience.

      Related collections

      Most cited references 76

      • Record: found
      • Abstract: found
      • Article: not found

      Global hydrological cycles and world water resources.

      Water is a naturally circulating resource that is constantly recharged. Therefore, even though the stocks of water in natural and artificial reservoirs are helpful to increase the available water resources for human society, the flow of water should be the main focus in water resources assessments. The climate system puts an upper limit on the circulation rate of available renewable freshwater resources (RFWR). Although current global withdrawals are well below the upper limit, more than two billion people live in highly water-stressed areas because of the uneven distribution of RFWR in time and space. Climate change is expected to accelerate water cycles and thereby increase the available RFWR. This would slow down the increase of people living under water stress; however, changes in seasonal patterns and increasing probability of extreme events may offset this effect. Reducing current vulnerability will be the first step to prepare for such anticipated changes.
        Bookmark
        • Record: found
        • Abstract: not found
        • Article: not found

        Global Water Resources: Vulnerability from Climate Change and Population Growth

          Bookmark
          • Record: found
          • Abstract: found
          • Article: not found

          High-latitude controls of thermocline nutrients and low latitude biological productivity.

          The ocean's biological pump strips nutrients out of the surface waters and exports them into the thermocline and deep waters. If there were no return path of nutrients from deep waters, the biological pump would eventually deplete the surface waters and thermocline of nutrients; surface biological productivity would plummet. Here we make use of the combined distributions of silicic acid and nitrate to trace the main nutrient return path from deep waters by upwelling in the Southern Ocean and subsequent entrainment into subantarctic mode water. We show that the subantarctic mode water, which spreads throughout the entire Southern Hemisphere and North Atlantic Ocean, is the main source of nutrients for the thermocline. We also find that an additional return path exists in the northwest corner of the Pacific Ocean, where enhanced vertical mixing, perhaps driven by tides, brings abyssal nutrients to the surface and supplies them to the thermocline of the North Pacific. Our analysis has important implications for our understanding of large-scale controls on the nature and magnitude of low-latitude biological productivity and its sensitivity to climate change.
            Bookmark

            Author and article information

            Journal
            Nature Climate Change
            Nature Clim Change
            Springer Nature
            1758-678X
            1758-6798
            January 2016
            December 7 2015
            : 6
            : 1
            : 42-50
            10.1038/nclimate2870
            © 2015

            http://www.springer.com/tdm

            Comments

            Comment on this article