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      Seroprevalence and risk factors for Neospora caninum infection in dogs in rural northeastern mainland China Translated title: Séroprévalence et facteurs de risque d’infection de Neospora caninum chez les chiens du nord-est de la Chine rurale

      1 , 1 , *

      Parasite

      EDP Sciences

      Dogs, Neospora caninum, Logistic models, Risk factors, Prevention and control

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          Abstract

          Although Neospora caninum is an important veterinary pathogen, veterinarians in various areas including in Mainland China lack a full understanding of neosporosis distribution in dog populations. This study aims to determine the emergence of anti- N. caninum antibodies in canine populations classified based on breeders, herdsmen, and huntsmen in northeast mainland China. In addition, the risk factors associated with seropositivity were explored. An indirect immunofluorescent antibody test (IFAT) was performed on canine serum to determine seroprevalence. Logistic regression models were used to collect and analyze individual and management data, in order to determine high-reliability predictors of seroprevalence as well as the level of anti- N. caninum antibodies. Among the 476 dogs tested, 95 (20%) were seropositive. Mixed breed (OR 1.53), former strays (OR 1.38), dogs living on cattle farms (OR 2.30), hunting dogs (OR 1.22) as well as raw meat feeding (OR 1.66) were correlated ( p < 0.05) with N. caninum infection. Interestingly, the seropositivity of dogs on cattle farms was higher (28%) than that of those (24.8%) living in breeding facilities ( p < 0.05). A large number of seropositive dogs were found on cattle farms in the study region, suggesting horizontal transmission between dogs and cattle. Therefore, this source of infection should be studied further, and should be a strong consideration in differential diagnoses of dogs raised on cattle farms.

          Translated abstract

          Bien que Neospora caninum soit un agent pathogène vétérinaire important, les vétérinaires de diverses régions, dont la Chine continentale, ne comprennent pas parfaitement la répartition de la néosporose dans les populations de chiens. Cette étude vise à déterminer l’émergence d’anticorps anti- N. caninum dans les populations canines classées comme reproducteurs, bergers et chasseurs du nord-est de la Chine. De plus, les facteurs de risque associés à la séropositivité ont été explorés. Un test d’immunofluorescence indirecte (IFAT) a été réalisé sur les sérums des chiens afin de déterminer la séroprévalence. Des modèles de régression logistique ont été utilisés pour collecter et analyser des données individuelles et de gestion, afin de déterminer les prédicteurs de fiabilité élevée de la séroprévalence ainsi que le niveau d’anticorps anti- N. caninum. Parmi les 476 chiens testés, 95 (20 %) étaient séropositifs. La race mélangée (OR 1,53), les animaux auparavant errants (OR 1,38), vivant dans des fermes d’élevage bovin (OR 2,30), les chiens de chasse (OR 1,22) ainsi que l’alimentation en viande crue (OR 1,66) étaient corrélés ( p < 0,05) avec l’infection à N. caninum. Fait intéressant, la séropositivité des chiens dans les fermes d’élevage bovin était supérieure (28 %) à celle de ceux (24,8 %) vivant dans des élevages de chiens ( p < 0,05). Un grand nombre de chiens séropositifs ont été trouvés dans des fermes d’élevage bovin dans la région étudiée, suggérant une transmission horizontale entre chiens et bovins. Par conséquent, cette source d’infection doit être étudiée plus avant et constituer un facteur important dans le diagnostic différentiel des chiens élevés dans des fermes d’élevage bovin.

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          Most cited references 31

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          Epidemiology and control of neosporosis and Neospora caninum.

          Neospora caninum is a protozoan parasite of animals. Until 1988, it was misidentified as Toxoplasma gondii. Since its first recognition in dogs in 1984 and the description of the new genus and species Neospora caninum in 1988, neosporosis has emerged as a serious disease of cattle and dogs worldwide. Abortions and neonatal mortality are a major problem in livestock operations, and neosporosis is a major cause of abortion in cattle. Although antibodies to N. caninum have been reported, the parasite has not been detected in human tissues. Thus, the zoonotic potential is uncertain. This review is focused mainly on the epidemiology and control of neosporosis in cattle, but worldwide seroprevalences of N. caninum in animals and humans are tabulated. The role of wildlife in the life cycle of N. caninum and strategies for the control of neosporosis in cattle are discussed.
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            Neosporosis in animals--the last five years.

             J.P. Dubey,  G Schares (2011)
            Neospora caninum is a protozoan parasite of animals. Until 1988, it was misdiagnosed as Toxoplasma gondii. Since its first recognition in 1984 in dogs and the description of a new genus and species Neospora caninum in 1988, neosporosis has emerged as a serious disease of cattle and dogs worldwide. Abortions and neonatal mortality are a major problem in livestock operations and neosporosis is a major cause of abortion in cattle. This review is focused on current status of neosporosis in animals based on papers published in the last five years. Worldwide seroprevalences are tabulated. Strategies for control and prevention are discussed. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.
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              A review of Neospora caninum and neosporosis.

              Neospora caninum is a recently recognized protozoan parasite of animals, which until 1988 was misidentified as Toxoplasma gondii. Its life cycle is unknown. Transplacental transmission is the only recognized mode of transmission. It has a wide host range, but its zoonotic potential is unknown. Neosporosis is a major cause of abortion in cattle in many countries. It is also an important cause of neuromuscular paralysis in dogs. This paper reviews information on parasite structure, life cycle, biology, clinical signs, diagnosis, treatment and control.
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                Author and article information

                Journal
                Parasite
                Parasite
                parasite
                Parasite
                EDP Sciences
                1252-607X
                1776-1042
                2019
                30 May 2019
                : 26
                : ( publisher-idID: parasite/2019/01 )
                Affiliations
                Department of Veterinary Surgery, Northeast Agricultural University Harbin 150030 Heilongjiang PR China
                Author notes
                [* ]Corresponding author: wanghb1960@ 123456163.com
                Article
                parasite190022 10.1051/parasite/2019034
                10.1051/parasite/2019034
                6542294
                31145075
                © X. Gao & H. Wang, published by EDP Sciences, 2019

                This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License ( http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

                Page count
                Figures: 0, Tables: 2, Equations: 0, References: 32, Pages: 6
                Categories
                Research Article

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