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      The development of the edible cricket industry in Thailand

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          Abstract

          Since cricket farming was introduced in Thailand in 1997, domestic, regional and international interest in the edible cricket industry has increased. This study aims to identify emerging themes related the development of the edible cricket industry over the past decades. It also discusses additional themes in the development of the cricket industry in connection to the work of other scholars, as well as future considerations to maintain the positive impacts of the industry on rural economic development, entrepreneurship and employment. Eight types of actors in the cricket industry were considered in this study: cricket farmers; wholesale traders and market vendors; tourism agents; international organisa tions; chefs; private companies; researchers; and governmental representatives. The farming and sale of crickets is still a small-scale activity which is relatively profitable for the farmers and other actors in the value chain. Based on the findings of this study, the constraints to growth and further expansion of the industry appear minimal at present. Nonetheless, speculations regarding the positive and negative impacts that further growth may have demonstrate the potential opportunities and threats to the industry. Considering the edible cricket industry as a part of the rural entrepreneurship and development policy discourse may be beneficial to sustainable development.

          Most cited references23

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          Diseases in insects produced for food and feed

          Increased production of insects on a large scale for food and feed will likely lead to many novel challenges, including problems with diseases. We provide an overview of important groups of insect pathogens, which can cause disease in insects produced for food and feed. Main characteristics of each pathogen group (viruses, bacteria, fungi, protists and nematodes) are described and illustrated, with a selection of examples from the most commonly produced insect species for food and feed. Honeybee and silkworm are mostly produced for other reasons than as human food, yet we can still use them as examples to learn about emergence of new diseases in production insects. Results from a 2014 survey about insect diseases in current insect production systems are presented for the first time. Finally, we give some recommendations for the prevention and control of insect diseases.
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            Entrepreneurship and financial constraints in Thailand

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              Regulating edible insects: the challenge of addressing food security, nature conservation, and the erosion of traditional food culture

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                Author and article information

                Journal
                jiff
                Journal of Insects as Food and Feed
                Wageningen Academic Publishers
                2352-4588
                10 June 2016
                : 2
                : 2
                : 91-100
                Affiliations
                [ 1 ] Department of Nutrition, Exercise and Sports, University of Copenhagen, Rolighedsvej 30, 1958 Frederiksberg C, Denmark
                [ 2 ] Nordic Food Lab, Department of Food Science, University of Copenhagen, Rolighedsvej 30, 1958 Frederiksberg C, Denmark
                [ 3 ] Department of Entomology, Khon Kaen University, 123 Mitapab Road, 40002 Khon Kaen, Thailand
                Author notes
                Article
                10.3920/JIFF2015.0091
                31a4879a-7c25-4cf9-81d6-ccb6515f76fd
                © 2016 Wageningen Academic Publishers
                History
                : 1 October 2015
                : 21 December 2015
                Categories
                RESEARCH ARTICLE

                Animal agriculture,General life sciences,Nutrition & Dietetics,Animal science & Zoology,Life sciences
                insect farming,entrepreneurship,Thailand,income generation,rural development

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