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      Cuticular extracts from Acromis sparsa (Coleoptera: Cassidinae) mediate arrestment behavior of the commensal canestriniid mite Grandiella rugosita.

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          Abstract

          Astigmatid mites in the family Canestriniidae are often closely associated with tortoise leaf beetles (Chrysomelidae: Cassidinae). For example, the survival of the commensal canestriniid mite Grandiella rugosita depends on dispersal to the cassidine beetle Acromis sparsa. Here, we tested whether the beetle cuticle provides chemical cues for host recognition for G. rugosita. In two-choice assays with cuticular extracts from A. sparsa and the co-occurring, non-host cassidine Chelymorpha alternans offered simultaneously, mites clearly preferred the area treated with extract from their host. In no-choice assays, G. rugosita spent three times longer and moved three times slower on host cuticular extracts compared to non-host extracts and the solvent control. Analyses of the chemical composition of cuticular extracts from males and females of A. sparsa and C. alternans revealed complex mixtures of mainly methyl branched hydrocarbons, which clearly separated both species in a principal component analysis. We found no qualitative difference between males and females of either species, but in C. alternans quantitative differences between males and females were detected. Our results demonstrate that G. rugosita is able to discriminate between cuticular extracts from its host A. sparsa and the non-host C. alternans. The components eliciting the observed arrestment behavior remain to be determined.

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          Author and article information

          Journal
          J. Chem. Ecol.
          Journal of chemical ecology
          Springer Nature
          1573-1561
          0098-0331
          Sep 2014
          : 40
          : 9
          Affiliations
          [1 ] Max Planck Institute for Chemical Ecology, Department Entomology, Hans-Knoell-Str.8, Jena, D-07745, Germany, fberan@ice.mpg.de.
          Article
          10.1007/s10886-014-0494-1
          25224678
          31e22607-0345-4aac-9f83-c4d8b0182e41
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