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      Muscle Mitochondrial ATP Synthesis and Glucose Transport/Phosphorylation in Type 2 Diabetes

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          Abstract

          Background

          Muscular insulin resistance is frequently characterized by blunted increases in glucose-6-phosphate (G-6-P) reflecting impaired glucose transport/phosphorylation. These abnormalities likely relate to excessive intramyocellular lipids and mitochondrial dysfunction. We hypothesized that alterations in insulin action and mitochondrial function should be present even in nonobese patients with well-controlled type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM).

          Methods and Findings

          We measured G-6-P, ATP synthetic flux (i.e., synthesis) and lipid contents of skeletal muscle with 31P/ 1H magnetic resonance spectroscopy in ten patients with T2DM and in two control groups: ten sex-, age-, and body mass-matched elderly people; and 11 younger healthy individuals. Although insulin sensitivity was lower in patients with T2DM, muscle lipid contents were comparable and hyperinsulinemia increased G-6-P by 50% (95% confidence interval [CI] 39%–99%) in all groups. Patients with diabetes had 27% lower fasting ATP synthetic flux compared to younger controls ( p = 0.031). Insulin stimulation increased ATP synthetic flux only in controls (younger: 26%, 95% CI 13%–42%; older: 11%, 95% CI 2%–25%), but failed to increase even during hyperglycemic hyperinsulinemia in patients with T2DM. Fasting free fatty acids and waist-to-hip ratios explained 44% of basal ATP synthetic flux. Insulin sensitivity explained 30% of insulin-stimulated ATP synthetic flux.

          Conclusions

          Patients with well-controlled T2DM feature slightly lower flux through muscle ATP synthesis, which occurs independently of glucose transport /phosphorylation and lipid deposition but is determined by lipid availability and insulin sensitivity. Furthermore, the reduction in insulin-stimulated glucose disposal despite normal glucose transport/phosphorylation suggests further abnormalities mainly in glycogen synthesis in these patients.

          Abstract

          Michael Roden and colleagues report that even patients with well-controlled insulin-resistant type 2 diabetes have altered mitochondrial function.

          Editors' Summary

          Background.

          Diabetes mellitus is an increasingly common chronic disease characterized by high blood sugar (glucose) levels. In normal individuals, blood sugar levels are maintained by the hormone insulin. Insulin is released by the pancreas when blood glucose levels rise after eating (glucose is produced by the digestion of food) and “instructs” insulin-responsive muscle and fat cells to take up glucose from the bloodstream. The cells then use glucose as a fuel or convert it into glycogen, a storage form of glucose. In type 2 diabetes, the commonest type of diabetes, the muscle and fat cells become nonresponsive to insulin (a condition called insulin resistance) and consequently blood glucose levels rise. Over time, this hyperglycemia increases the risk of heart attacks, kidney failure, and other life-threatening complications.

          Why Was This Study Done?

          Insulin resistance is often an early sign of type 2 diabetes, sometimes predating its development by many years, so understanding its causes might provide clues about how to stop the global diabetes epidemic. One theory is that mitochondria—cellular structures that produce the energy (in the form of a molecule called ATP) needed to keep cells functioning—do not work properly in people with insulin resistance. Mitochondria change (metabolize) fatty acids into energy, and recent studies have revealed that fat accumulation caused by poorly regulated fatty acid metabolism blocks insulin signaling, thus causing insulin resistance. Other studies using magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) to study mitochondrial function noninvasively in human muscle indicate that mitochondria are dysfunctional in people with insulin resistance by showing that ATP synthesis is impaired in such individuals. In this study, the researchers have examined both baseline and insulin-stimulated mitochondrial function in nonobese patients with well-controlled type 2 diabetes and in normal controls to discover more about the relationship between mitochondrial dysfunction and insulin resistance.

          What Did the Researchers Do and Find?

          The researchers determined the insulin sensitivity of people with type 2 diabetes and two sets of people (the “controls”) who did not have diabetes: one in which the volunteers were age-matched to the people with diabetes, and the other containing younger individuals (insulin resistance increases with age). To study insulin sensitivity in all three groups, the researchers used a “hyperinsulinemic–euglycemic clamp.” For this, after an overnight fast, the participants' insulin levels were kept high with a continuous insulin infusion while blood glucose levels were kept normal using a variable glucose infusion. In this situation, the glucose infusion rate equals glucose uptake by the body and therefore measures tissue sensitivity to insulin. Before and during the clamp, the researchers used MRS to measure glucose-6-phosphate (an indicator of how effectively glucose is taken into cells and phosphorylated), ATP synthesis, and the fat content of the participants' muscle cells. Insulin sensitivity was lower in the patients with diabetes than in the controls, but muscle lipid content was comparable and hyperinsulinemia increased glucose-6-phosphate levels similarly in all the groups. Patients with diabetes and the older controls had lower fasting ATP synthesis rates than the young controls and, whereas insulin stimulation increased ATP synthesis in all the controls, it had no effect in the patients with diabetes. In addition, fasting blood fatty acid levels were inversely related to basal ATP synthesis, whereas insulin sensitivity was directly related to insulin-stimulated ATP synthesis.

          What Do These Findings Mean?

          These findings indicate that the impairment of muscle mitochondrial ATP synthesis in fasting conditions and after insulin stimulation in people with diabetes is not due to impaired glucose transport/phosphorylation or fat deposition in the muscles. Instead, it seems to be determined by lipid availability and insulin sensitivity. These results add to the evidence suggesting that mitochondrial function is disrupted in type 2 diabetes and in insulin resistance, but also suggest that there may be abnormalities in glycogen synthesis. More work is needed to determine the exact nature of these abnormalities and to discover whether they can be modulated to prevent the development of insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes. For now, though, these findings re-emphasize the need for people with type 2 diabetes or insulin resistance to reduce their food intake to compensate for the reduced energy needs of their muscles and to exercise to increase the ATP-generating capacity of their muscles. Both lifestyle changes could improve their overall health and life expectancy.

          Additional Information.

          Please access these Web sites via the online version of this summary at http://dx.doi.org/10.1371/journal.pmed.0040154.

          • The MedlinePlus encyclopedia has pages on diabetes

          • The US National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases provides information for patients on diabetes and insulin resistance

          • The US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has information on diabetes for patients and professionals

          • American Diabetes Association provides information for patients on diabetes and insulin resistance

          • Diabetes UK has information for patients and professionals on diabetes

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          Most cited references33

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          • Abstract: found
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          Decline in skeletal muscle mitochondrial function with aging in humans.

          Cumulative mtDNA damage occurs in aging animals, and mtDNA mutations are reported to accelerate aging in mice. We determined whether aging results in increased DNA oxidative damage and reduced mtDNA abundance and mitochondrial function in skeletal muscle of human subjects. Studies performed in 146 healthy men and women aged 18-89 yr demonstrated that mtDNA and mRNA abundance and mitochondrial ATP production all declined with advancing age. Abundance of mtDNA was positively related to mitochondrial ATP production rate, which in turn, was closely associated with aerobic capacity and glucose tolerance. The content of several mitochondrial proteins was reduced in older muscles, whereas the level of the oxidative DNA lesion, 8-oxo-deoxyguanosine, was increased, supporting the oxidative damage theory of aging. These results demonstrate that age-related muscle mitochondrial dysfunction is related to reduced mtDNA and muscle functional changes that are common in the elderly.
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            • Record: found
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            Intramyocellular lipid concentrations are correlated with insulin sensitivity in humans: a 1H NMR spectroscopy study.

            Recent muscle biopsy studies have shown a relation between intramuscular lipid content and insulin resistance. The aim of this study was to test this relation in humans by using a novel proton nuclear magnetic resonance (1H NMR) spectroscopy technique, which enables non-invasive and rapid (approximately 45 min) determination of intramyocellular lipid (IMCL) content. Normal weight non-diabetic adults (n = 23, age 29+/-2 years. BMI = 24.1+/-0.5 kg/m2) were studied using cross-sectional analysis. Insulin sensitivity was assessed by a 2-h hyperinsulinaemic (approximately 450 pmol/l)-euglycaemic (approximately 5 mmol/l) clamp test. Intramyocellular lipid concentrations were determined by using localized 1H NMR spectroscopy of soleus muscle. Simple linear regression analysis showed an inverse correlation (r = -0.579, p = 0.0037) [corrected] between intramyocellular lipid content and M-value (100-120 min of clamp) as well as between fasting plasma non-esterified fatty acid concentration and M-value (r = -0.54, p = 0.0267). Intramyocellular lipid content was not related to BMI, age and fasting plasma concentrations of triglycerides, non-esterified fatty acids, glucose or insulin. These results show that intramyocellular lipid concentration, as assessed non invasively by localized 1H NMR spectroscopy, is a good indicator of whole body insulin sensitivity in non-diabetic, non-obese humans.
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              Effect of insulin on human skeletal muscle mitochondrial ATP production, protein synthesis, and mRNA transcripts.

              Mitochondria are the primary site of skeletal muscle fuel metabolism and ATP production. Although insulin is a major regulator of fuel metabolism, its effect on mitochondrial ATP production is not known. Here we report increases in vastus lateralis muscle mitochondrial ATP production capacity (32-42%) in healthy humans (P < 0.01) i.v. infused with insulin (1.5 milliunits/kg of fat-free mass per min) while clamping glucose, amino acids, glucagon, and growth hormone. Increased ATP production occurred in association with increased mRNA levels from both mitochondrial (NADH dehydrogenase subunit IV) and nuclear [cytochrome c oxidase (COX) subunit IV] genes (164-180%) encoding mitochondrial proteins (P < 0.05). In addition, muscle mitochondrial protein synthesis, and COX and citrate synthase enzyme activities were increased by insulin (P < 0.05). Further studies demonstrated no effect of low to high insulin levels on muscle mitochondrial ATP production for people with type 2 diabetes mellitus, whereas matched nondiabetic controls increased 16-26% (P < 0.02) when four different substrate combinations were used. In conclusion, insulin stimulates mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation in skeletal muscle along with synthesis of gene transcripts and mitochondrial protein in human subjects. Skeletal muscle of type 2 diabetic patients has a reduced capacity to increase ATP production with high insulin levels.
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                Author and article information

                Contributors
                Role: Academic Editor
                Journal
                PLoS Med
                pmed
                PLoS Medicine
                Public Library of Science (San Francisco, USA )
                1549-1277
                1549-1676
                May 2007
                1 May 2007
                : 4
                : 5
                : e154
                Affiliations
                [1 ] Department of Internal Medicine 3, University of Vienna, Vienna, Austria
                [2 ] Karl-Landsteiner Institute of Endocrinology and Metabolism, Vienna, Austria
                [3 ] High-Field Magnetic Resonance Centre of Excellence, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna, Austria
                [4 ] First Medical Department, Hanusch Hospital, Vienna, Austria
                Yale Medical School, United States of America
                Author notes
                * To whom correspondence should be addressed. E-mail: michael.roden@ 123456meduniwien.ac.at
                Article
                06-PLME-RA-0733R3 plme-04-05-02
                10.1371/journal.pmed.0040154
                1858707
                17472434
                32074d80-a545-48ce-85d8-1d917ac97f10
                Copyright: © 2007 Szendroedi et al. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.
                History
                : 25 September 2006
                : 28 February 2007
                Page count
                Pages: 10
                Categories
                Research Article
                Diabetes and Endocrinology
                Nutrition
                Physiology
                Endocrinology
                Diabetes
                Nutrition and Metabolism
                Custom metadata
                Szendroedi J, Schmid AI, Chmelik M, Toth C, Brehm A, et al. (2007) Muscle mitochondrial ATP synthesis and glucose transport/phosphorylation in type 2 diabetes. PLoS Med 4(5): e154. doi: 10.1371/journal.pmed.0040154

                Medicine
                Medicine

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