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    Are gastroenterologists willing to implement imaging-guided surveillance for Barrett’s esophagus? Results from a national survey

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        Abstract

        Introduction: The American Society for Gastrointestinal Endoscopy (ASGE) has published a Preservation and Incorporation of Valuable Endoscopic Innovations (PIVI) statement on incorporating an imaging-guided surveillance protocol to replace the current practice of four-quadrant biopsies every two centimeters for Barrett’s esophagus (BE) surveillance. We sought to determine if current gastroenterologists would be willing to apply these changes to their practice and identify any barriers to implementation. Methods: We collected data using surveys that were distributed at two national meetings and using a random selection process emailed surveys to members listed in the American Gastroenterological Association directory. Physicians from a variety of practice settings participated. Primary outcomes of our study included determining whether clinicians would be willing to accept an imaging-based surveillance protocol, their reasons for not doing so, and whether a financial incentive would be persuade them to implement the protocol. Continuous variables were reported as mean ± standard deviation. Categorical variables were summarized with percentages and 95 % confidence intervals. Results: Gastroenterologists (172) completed the survey; and 140 (81.4 %) of them stated they would implemented the PIVI recommendations into practice. Using a multivariate analysis of the data, physicians who reported a financial incentive for submitting biopsy specimens to pathology were less likely to implement the PIVI recommendations. The two main barriers to implementation of the protocol were medical-legal and financial reasons. Of the 32 gastroenterologists who were not willing to implement the imaging-guided surveillance protocol, 20 (62.5 %) stated that they would implement it if there were a financial incentive. Discussion: The PIVI statement focuses on re-evaluating our current method of surveillance for BE. The results of our survey show that gastroenterologists may be willing to implement an imaging-guided surveillance program, but concerns regarding financial compensation and proper training in advanced imaging techniques remain.

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        Most cited references 6

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        Adherence to biopsy guidelines for Barrett's esophagus surveillance in the community setting in the United States.

        Current surveillance guidelines for Barrett's esophagus (BE) recommend extensive biopsies to minimize sampling error. Biopsy practice patterns for BE surveillance in the community have not been well-described. We used a national community-based pathology database to analyze adherence to guidelines and to determine whether adherence was associated with dysplasia detection. We identified 10,958 cases of established BE in the Caris Diagnostics pathology database from January 2002-April 2007. Demographic, pathologic, and endoscopic data were recorded. Dysplasia was categorized as low grade, high grade, or adenocarcinoma. Adherence was defined as > or =4 esophageal biopsies per 2 cm BE or a ratio > or =2.0. Generalized estimating equation multivariable analysis was performed to assess factors associated with adherence, adjusted for clustering by individual gastroenterologist. A total of 2245 BE surveillance cases were identified with linked endoscopy reports that recorded BE length and could be assessed for adherence. Adherence to guidelines was seen in 51.2% of cases. In multivariable analysis, longer segment BE was associated with significantly reduced adherence (3-5 cm, odds ratio [OR] 0.14, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.10-0.19; 6-8 cm, OR 0.06, 95% CI 0.03-0.09; > or =9 cm, OR 0.03, 95% CI 0.01-0.07). Stratified by BE length, nonadherence was associated with significantly decreased dysplasia detection (summary OR 0.53, 95% CI 0.35-0.82). Adherence to BE biopsy guidelines in the community is low, and nonadherence is associated with significantly decreased dysplasia detection. Future studies should identify factors underlying nonadherence as well as mechanisms to increase adherence to guidelines to improve early detection of dysplasia.
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          Real-time increased detection of neoplastic tissue in Barrett's esophagus with probe-based confocal laser endomicroscopy: final results of an international multicenter, prospective, randomized, controlled trial.

          Probe-based confocal laser endomicroscopy (pCLE) allows real-time detection of neoplastic Barrett's esophagus (BE) tissue. However, the accuracy of pCLE in real time has not yet been extensively evaluated. To compare the sensitivity and specificity of pCLE in addition to high-definition white-light endoscopy (HD-WLE) with HD-WLE alone for the detection of high-grade dysplasia (HGD) and early carcinoma (EC) in BE. International, prospective, multicenter, randomized, controlled trial. Five tertiary referral centers. A total of 101 consecutive BE patients presenting for surveillance or endoscopic treatment of HGD/EC. All patients were examined by HD-WLE, narrow-band imaging (NBI), and pCLE, and the findings were recorded before biopsy samples were obtained. The order of HD-WLE and NBI was randomized and performed by 2 independent, blinded endoscopists. All suspicious lesions on HD-WLE or NBI and 4-quadrant random locations were documented. These locations were examined by pCLE, and a presumptive diagnosis of benign or neoplastic (HGD/EC) tissue was made in real time. Finally, biopsies were taken from all locations and were reviewed by a central pathologist, blinded to endoscopic and pCLE data. Diagnostic characteristics of pCLE. The sensitivity and specificity for HD-WLE were 34.2% and 92.7%, respectively, compared with 68.3% and 87.8%, respectively, for HD-WLE or pCLE (P = .002 and P < .001, respectively). The sensitivity and specificity for HD-WLE or NBI were 45.0% and 88.2%, respectively, compared with 75.8% and 84.2%, respectively, for HD-WLE, NBI, or pCLE (P = .01 and P = .02, respectively). Use of pCLE in conjunction with HD-WLE and NBI enabled the identification of 2 and 1 additional HGD/EC patients compared with HD-WLE and HD-WLE or NBI, respectively, resulting in detection of all HGD/EC patients, although not statistically significant. Academic centers with enriched population. pCLE combined with HD-WLE significantly improved the ability to detect neoplasia in BE patients compared with HD-WLE. This may allow better informed decisions to be made for the management and subsequent treatment of BE patients. ( NCT00795184.). Copyright © 2011 American Society for Gastrointestinal Endoscopy. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.
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            Advanced imaging technologies increase detection of dysplasia and neoplasia in patients with Barrett's esophagus: a meta-analysis and systematic review.

            US guidelines recommend surveillance of patients with Barrett's esophagus (BE) to detect dysplasia. BE conventionally is monitored via white-light endoscopy (WLE) and a collection of random biopsy specimens. However, this approach does not definitively or consistently detect areas of dysplasia. Advanced imaging technologies can increase the detection of dysplasia and cancer. We investigated whether these imaging technologies can increase the diagnostic yield for the detection of neoplasia in patients with BE, compared with WLE and analysis of random biopsy specimens. We performed a systematic review, using Medline and Embase, to identify relevant peer-review studies. Fourteen studies were included in the final analysis, with a total of 843 patients. Our metameter (estimate) of interest was the paired-risk difference (RD), defined as the difference in yield of the detection of dysplasia or cancer using advanced imaging vs WLE. The estimated paired-RD and 95% confidence interval (CI) were obtained using random-effects models. Heterogeneity was assessed by means of the Q statistic and the I(2) statistic. An exploratory meta-regression was performed to look for associations between the metameter and potential confounders or modifiers. Overall, advanced imaging techniques increased the diagnostic yield for detection of dysplasia or cancer by 34% (95% CI, 20%-56%; P < .0001). A subgroup analysis showed that virtual chromoendoscopy significantly increased the diagnostic yield (RD, 0.34; 95% CI, 0.14-0.56; P < .0001). The RD for chromoendoscopy was 0.35 (95% CI, 0.13-0.56; P = .0001). There was no significant difference between virtual chromoendoscopy and chromoendoscopy, based on Student t test analysis (P = .45). Based on a meta-analysis, advanced imaging techniques such as chromoendoscopy or virtual chromoendoscopy significantly increase the diagnostic yield for identification of dysplasia or cancer in patients with BE. Copyright © 2013 AGA Institute. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
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              Author and article information

              Affiliations
              [1 ]Loyola University Medical Center, Department of Gastroenterology, Maywood, Illinois, United States
              [2 ]University of Kansas Medical Center, Department of Gastroenterology, Kansas City, Kansas, United States
              Author notes
              Corresponding author Neil Gupta 2160 S. 1st Avenue, Building 54, Room 167Maywood, Illinois 60153United States1-708-216-4113 negupta@ 123456lumc.edu
              Journal
              Endosc Int Open
              Endosc Int Open
              10.1055/s-0034-1377934
              Endoscopy International Open
              © Georg Thieme Verlag KG (Stuttgart · New York )
              2364-3722
              2196-9736
              June 2015
              06 May 2015
              : 3
              : 3
              : E181-E185
              4486030
              10.1055/s-0034-1391413
              © Thieme Medical Publishers
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              Article

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