0
views
0
recommends
+1 Recommend
1 collections
    0
    shares
      • Record: found
      • Abstract: found
      • Article: found
      Is Open Access

      The Australian Lynx Spiders (Araneae, Oxyopidae, Oxyopes) of the Godeffroy Collection, including the description of a new species

      , , ,

      Evolutionary Systematics

      Pensoft Publishers

      Read this article at

      ScienceOpenPublisher
      Bookmark
          There is no author summary for this article yet. Authors can add summaries to their articles on ScienceOpen to make them more accessible to a non-specialist audience.

          Abstract

          The historical Godeffroy Collection of spiders at the Centrum für Naturkunde (CeNak) in Hamburg comprises several hundred type specimens from Australia and is an essential source for arachnologists around the world. In this paper, we re-describe and illustrate the Australian Oxyopes material from this collection. Most specimens were collected by C. F. Eduard Dämel for the Godeffroy Museum and described in 1871-1881 by pioneering arachnologist Ludwig Carl Christian Koch as part of the first monograph on Australian spiders: Die Arachniden Australiens. Twelve species are redescribed and properly illustrated for the first time: Oxyopes amoenus L. Koch, 1878, Oxyopes attenuatus L. Koch, 1878, Oxyopes elegans L. Koch, 1878, Oxyopes gratus L. Koch, 1878, Oxyopes gracilipes (White, 1849), Oxyopes macilentus L. Koch, 1878, Oxyopes molarius L. Koch, 1878, Oxyopes mundulus L. Koch, 1878, Oxyopes punctatus L. Koch, 1878, Oxyopes quadrifasciatus L. Koch, 1878, Oxyopes rubicundus L. Koch, 1878, and Oxyopes variabilis L. Koch, 1878. Oxyopes lautus L. Koch, 1878 is treated as a numen dubium because both palps are lost. The new species Oxyopes godeffroyi sp. n. is described from this historical material and was probably overlooked by Koch. An identification key for these species is provided and the history of these specimens reviewed briefly. A map shows the localities of the redescribed Oxyopes species and the general distribution of the Oxyopes species in Queensland.

          Related collections

          Most cited references 9

          • Record: found
          • Abstract: not found
          • Article: not found

          Little left to lose: deforestation and forest degradation in Australia since European colonization

            Bookmark
            • Record: found
            • Abstract: not found
            • Article: not found

            A Protocol For Digesting Internal Soft Tissues And Mounting Spiders For Scanning Electron Microscopy

              Bookmark
              • Record: found
              • Abstract: found
              • Book: not found

              Field Guide to Spiders of Australia

              Australians have a love–hate relationship with spiders. Some spiders, such as the Redback and the Sydney Funnelweb, inspire fear. Yet Peacock Spiders, with their colourful fan-spreading courtship dances, have won rapturous appreciation worldwide. A Field Guide to Spiders of Australia uses photographs of living animals to help people identify many of the spiders they encounter. Featuring over 1300 colour photographs, it is the most comprehensive account of Australian spiders ever published. With more than two-thirds of Australian spiders yet to be scientifically described, this book sets the scene for future explorations of our extraordinary Australian fauna. This field guide will be enjoyed by naturalists and anyone with an interest in learning more about Australia's incredible arachnids. Recipient of the 2018 Whitley Certificate of Commendation for Field Guide
                Bookmark

                Author and article information

                Journal
                Evolutionary Systematics
                EvolSyst
                Pensoft Publishers
                2535-0730
                December 22 2017
                December 22 2017
                : 1
                : 1
                : 11-37
                Article
                10.3897/evolsyst.1.14652
                © 2017

                Comments

                Comment on this article