2
views
0
recommends
+1 Recommend
2 collections
    0
    shares
      • Record: found
      • Abstract: found
      • Article: found
      Is Open Access

      Dragonflies (Insecta: Odonata) from Mananciais da Serra, a Tropical-Araucaria Forest ecotonal remnant in the southern Atlantic Forest, state of Paraná, Brazil

      Read this article at

      Bookmark
          There is no author summary for this article yet. Authors can add summaries to their articles on ScienceOpen to make them more accessible to a non-specialist audience.

          Abstract

          ABSTRACT This study provides a comprehensive checklist of Odonata species from the protected area of Mananciais da Serra. The survey was conducted in the endangered Atlantic Forest domain at the southern Serra do Mar mountain chain within a well-preserved area in the municipality of Piraquara, state of Paraná, Brazil. Adults and larvae were sampled between June 2017 and March 2020 using different techniques in numerous mesohabitats, including phytotelmata, pools, small streams, and large reservoirs. A total of 1,708 specimens from 9 families, 43 genera and 84 species were sampled resulting in 53 new records for the state of Paraná, almost doubling the known occurrence records for dragonflies and damselflies in that state. Furthermore, two hitherto undescribed females from the genera Planiplax and Heteragrion, four ultimate stadium larvae from Planiplax, Neocordulia, Heteragrion, and Acanthagrion, and five undescribed species were detected, one each from the genera Heteragrion, Progomphus, Brechmorhoga, Erythrodiplax, and Dasythemis. The estimated richness of odonates in this area is greater than 100 species, while the observed richness corresponding to almost 10% of all Odonata species in Brazil, the species-richest country in the world. These results reiterate the need to investigate undersampled areas to improve knowledge on diversity, taxonomy, and distribution of neotropical species. Finally, taxonomic notes for some species, including the rare corduliid Neocordulia mambucabensis Costa & T.C. Santos, 2000, are provided.

          Related collections

          Most cited references 83

          • Record: found
          • Abstract: not found
          • Article: not found

          The Brazilian Atlantic Forest: How much is left, and how is the remaining forest distributed? Implications for conservation

            Bookmark
            • Record: found
            • Abstract: found
            • Article: not found

            The current biodiversity extinction event: scenarios for mitigation and recovery.

            The current massive degradation of habitat and extinction of species is taking place on a catastrophically short timescale, and their effects will fundamentally reset the future evolution of the planet's biota. The fossil record suggests that recovery of global ecosystems has required millions or even tens of millions of years. Thus, intervention by humans, the very agents of the current environmental crisis, is required for any possibility of short-term recovery or maintenance of the biota. Many current recovery efforts have deficiencies, including insufficient information on the diversity and distribution of species, ecological processes, and magnitude and interaction of threats to biodiversity (pollution, overharvesting, climate change, disruption of biogeochemical cycles, introduced or invasive species, habitat loss and fragmentation through land use, disruption of community structure in habitats, and others). A much greater and more urgently applied investment to address these deficiencies is obviously warranted. Conservation and restoration in human-dominated ecosystems must strengthen connections between human activities, such as agricultural or harvesting practices, and relevant research generated in the biological, earth, and atmospheric sciences. Certain threats to biodiversity require intensive international cooperation and input from the scientific community to mitigate their harmful effects, including climate change and alteration of global biogeochemical cycles. In a world already transformed by human activity, the connection between humans and the ecosystems they depend on must frame any strategy for the recovery of the biota.
              Bookmark
              • Record: found
              • Abstract: not found
              • Article: not found

              Conserving the hottest of the hotspots

                Bookmark

                Author and article information

                Journal
                zool
                Zoologia (Curitiba)
                Zoologia (Curitiba)
                Sociedade Brasileira de Zoologia (Curitiba, PR, Brazil )
                1984-4670
                1984-4689
                2021
                : 38
                Affiliations
                Curitiba Paraná orgnameUniversidade Federal do Paraná orgdiv1Departamento de Zoologia orgdiv2Laboratório de Sistemática de Insetos Aquáticos Brazil
                Curitiba Paraná orgnameUniversidade Federal do Paraná orgdiv1Departamento de Zoologia orgdiv2Programa de Pós-graduação em Ciências Biológicas (Entomologia) Brazil
                Article
                S1984-46702021000100302 S1984-4670(21)03800000302
                10.3897/zoologia.38.e55283

                This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License.

                Page count
                Figures: 0, Tables: 0, Equations: 0, References: 71, Pages: 0
                Product
                Product Information: website
                Categories
                Research Article

                Comments

                Comment on this article