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      Changing the global obesity narrative to recognize and reduce weight stigma: A position statement from the World Obesity Federation

      1 , 2 , 3 , 4 , 5 , 6 , 7 , 8 , 8 , 8 , 9 , 10 , 11 , 6 , 12 , 13 , 14 , 15 , 16 , 17 , 18 , 19 , 20 , 21 , 22 , 23 , 24 , 8 , 25 , 8 , 26 , 27 , 28 , 29 , 30 , 31 , 32 , 33 , 34 , 8 , 35 , 36
      Obesity Reviews
      Wiley

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          Summary

          Weight stigma, defined as pervasive misconceptions and stereotypes associated with higher body weight, is both a social determinant of health and a human rights issue. It is imperative to consider how weight stigma may be impeding health promotion efforts on a global scale. The World Obesity Federation (WOF) convened a global working group of practitioners, researchers, policymakers, youth advocates, and individuals with lived experience of obesity to consider the ways that global obesity narratives may contribute to weight stigma. Specifically, the working group focused on how overall obesity narratives, food and physical activity narratives, and scientific and public‐facing language may contribute to weight stigma. The impact of weight stigma across the lifespan was also considered. Taking a global perspective, nine recommendations resulted from this work for global health research and health promotion efforts that can help to reduce harmful obesity narratives, both inside and outside health contexts.

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          Obesity in adults: a clinical practice guideline

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            Joint international consensus statement for ending stigma of obesity

            People with obesity commonly face a pervasive, resilient form of social stigma. They are often subject to discrimination in the workplace as well as in educational and healthcare settings. Research indicates that weight stigma can cause physical and psychological harm, and that affected individuals are less likely to receive adequate care. For these reasons, weight stigma damages health, undermines human and social rights, and is unacceptable in modern societies. To inform healthcare professionals, policymakers, and the public about this issue, a multidisciplinary group of international experts, including representatives of scientific organizations, reviewed available evidence on the causes and harms of weight stigma and, using a modified Delphi process, developed a joint consensus statement with recommendations to eliminate weight bias. Academic institutions, professional organizations, media, public-health authorities, and governments should encourage education about weight stigma to facilitate a new public narrative about obesity, coherent with modern scientific knowledge.
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              Obesity stigma: important considerations for public health.

              Stigma and discrimination toward obese persons are pervasive and pose numerous consequences for their psychological and physical health. Despite decades of science documenting weight stigma, its public health implications are widely ignored. Instead, obese persons are blamed for their weight, with common perceptions that weight stigmatization is justifiable and may motivate individuals to adopt healthier behaviors. We examine evidence to address these assumptions and discuss their public health implications. On the basis of current findings, we propose that weight stigma is not a beneficial public health tool for reducing obesity. Rather, stigmatization of obese individuals threatens health, generates health disparities, and interferes with effective obesity intervention efforts. These findings highlight weight stigma as both a social justice issue and a priority for public health.
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                Author and article information

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                Journal
                Obesity Reviews
                Obesity Reviews
                Wiley
                1467-7881
                1467-789X
                October 17 2023
                Affiliations
                [1 ] Educational Psychology and Leadership Studies University of Victoria Victoria British Columbia Canada
                [2 ] Department of Public Health and Community Medicine Sahlgrenska Academy at Gothenburg University Gothenburg Sweden
                [3 ] Department of Kinesiology, Sport, and Recreation University of Alberta Edmonton Canada
                [4 ] Replica Communications Kristianstad Sweden
                [5 ] Obesity Canada Edmonton Canada
                [6 ] European Association for the Study of Obesity Teddington UK
                [7 ] Internal and Obesity Medicine University of the West Indies School of Clinical Medicine and Research Nassau Bahamas
                [8 ] World Obesity Federation London UK
                [9 ] George Institute for Global Health Sydney Australia
                [10 ] Children's Hospital Westmead Clinical School University of Sydney Sydney Australia
                [11 ] Irish Coalition for People Living with Obesity Dublin Ireland
                [12 ] George Institute for Global Health Imperial College London London UK
                [13 ] WW International, Inc., Department of Health Outcomes and Biomedical Informatics University of Florida College of Medicine Gainesville Florida USA
                [14 ] Hriday New Delhi India
                [15 ] Advanced Center for Metabolic Medicine and Nutrition (CAMMYN) Santiago Chile
                [16 ] Advancing Synergy Baltimore Maryland USA
                [17 ] Educational Consultant and Patient Advocate Kuwait City Kuwait
                [18 ] Center for Global Noncommunicable Diseases RTI International Research Triangle Park North Carolina USA
                [19 ] Department of Geriatric Research Education and Clinical Care (GRECC) Gainesville Florida USA
                [20 ] ConscienHealth Pittsburgh Pennsylvania USA
                [21 ] National Institute for Health and Care Excellence London UK
                [22 ] European Coalition for People Living with Obesity Dublin Ireland
                [23 ] Health Consumers' Council WA Mount Lawley Australia
                [24 ] Obesity Action Coalition Tampa Florida USA
                [25 ] Nutrition Unit Hospital Clínico de La Universidad de Chile Santiago Chile
                [26 ] Rudd Center for Food Policy and Obesity University of Connecticut Storrs Connecticut USA
                [27 ] Gastrobariatrica Santa Fe Santa Fe New Mexico USA
                [28 ] Psychology Convening Group Ramapo College of New Jersey Mahwah New Jersey USA
                [29 ] Neuroendocrine Unit, Pediatric Endocrinology, Nutrition Obesity Research Center at Harvard Massachusetts General Hospital/Harvard Medical School Boston Massachusetts USA
                [30 ] Global Health Medicine And Health, Faculty of Biology University Of Manchester Manchester UK
                [31 ] Singapore Association for the Study of Obesity Singapore
                [32 ] Obesity Society of Nigeria Abuja Nigeria
                [33 ] Nutrition and Health Research Center National Institute of Public Health Mexico Cuernavaca Mexico
                [34 ] Healthy Caribbean Coalition Bridgetown Barbados
                [35 ] University of Liverpool Liverpool UK
                [36 ] Andrea Bariatric Surgery Subang Jaya Malaysia
                Article
                10.1111/obr.13642
                37846179
                3327b0cf-9183-4efe-848a-02a6d6b615f7
                © 2023

                http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/

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