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      A systematic mapping review of the associations between pregnancy intentions and health-related lifestyle behaviours or psychological wellbeing

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          Abstract

          The aim of this study was to conduct a systematic mapping review of the literature that explored associations of pregnancy intentions with health-related lifestyle behaviours and psychological wellbeing before and during pregnancy. Six databases were searched (May 2017) for papers relating to pregnancy intentions, health-related lifestyle behaviours, and psychological wellbeing. The literature was mapped according to the preconception or pregnancy period; prospective or retrospective variable assessment; and reported lifestyle behaviours and psychological wellbeing outcomes. Of 19,430 retrieved records, 303 studies were eligible. Pregnancy intentions were considered during the preconception period in 103 studies (only 23 assessed prospectively), and during the pregnancy period in 208 studies (141 prospectively). Associations between pregnancy intention and preconception behaviours/psychological wellbeing were primarily reported for supplement use (n = 58) and were lacking for diet/exercise, and psychological factors. For behaviours/psychological wellbeing during pregnancy, associations with pregnancy intention were focused on prenatal care (n = 79), depression (n = 61), and smoking (n = 56) and were lacking for diet/exercise. Only 7 studies assessed pregnancy intentions with a validated tool. Despite a large body of literature, there were several methodological limitations identified, namely assessment of pregnancy intentions with non-validated measures and the reliance on retrospective assessment. Future primary studies are needed to fill gaps in our understanding regarding energy-balance-related behaviours. Future studies (including reviews/meta-analyses) should take care to address the noted limitations to provide a comprehensive and accurate understanding of the relationships between pregnancy intentions and health-related lifestyle behaviours and psychological wellbeing before and during pregnancy.

          Highlights

          • Reliance on the assessment of pregnancy intentions with non-validated measures

          • Reliance on retrospective assessment

          • Studies on preconception pregnancy intentions and diet/exercise lacking

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          Most cited references 54

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          Dose-response relationship between alcohol consumption before and during pregnancy and the risks of low birthweight, preterm birth and small for gestational age (SGA)-a systematic review and meta-analyses.

          Descriptions of the effects of moderate alcohol consumption during pregnancy on adverse pregnancy outcomes have been inconsistent. To review systematically and perform meta-analyses on the effect of maternal alcohol exposure on the risk of low birthweight, preterm birth and small for gestational age (SGA). Using Medical Subject Headings, a literature search of MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, CABS, WHOlist, SIGLE, ETOH, and Web of Science between 1 January 1980 and 1 August 2009 was performed followed by manual searches. Case-control or cohort studies were assessed for quality (STROBE), 36 available studies were included. Two reviewers independently extracted the information on low birthweight, preterm birth and SGA using a standardised protocol. Meta-analyses on dose-response relationships were performed using linear as well as first-order and second-order fractional polynomial regressions to estimate best fitting curves to the data. Compared with abstainers, the overall dose-response relationships for low birthweight and SGA showed no effect up to 10 g pure alcohol/day (an average of about 1 drink/day) and preterm birth showed no effect up to 18 g pure alcohol/day (an average of 1.5 drinks/day); thereafter, the relationship showed a monotonically increasing risk for increasing maternal alcohol consumption. Moderate consumption during pre-pregnancy was associated with reduced risks for all outcomes. Dose-response relationship indicates that heavy alcohol consumption during pregnancy increases the risks of all three outcomes whereas light to moderate alcohol consumption shows no effect. Preventive measures during antenatal consultations should be initiated. © 2011 The Authors BJOG An International Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology © 2011 RCOG.
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            The prevalence and impact of overweight and obesity in an Australian obstetric population.

            To assess the prevalence and impact of overweight and obesity in an Australian obstetric population. The Mater Mother's Hospital (MMH), South Brisbane, is an urban tertiary referral maternity hospital. We reviewed data for the 18 401 women who were booked for antenatal care at the MMH, delivered between January 1998 and December 2002, and had a singleton pregnancy. Of those women, 14 230 had an estimated pre-pregnancy body mass index (BMI) noted in their record; 2978 women with BMI 40 kg/m(2)). Prevalence of overweight and obesity in an obstetric population; maternal, peripartum and neonatal outcomes associated with raised BMI. Of the 14 230 women, 6443 (45%) were of normal weight, and 4809 (34%) were overweight, obese or morbidly obese. Overweight, obese and morbidly obese women were at increased risk of adverse outcomes (figures represent adjusted odds ratio [AOR] [95% CI]): hypertensive disorders of pregnancy (overweight 1.74 [1.45-2.15], obese 3.00 [2.40-3.74], morbidly obese 4.87 [3.27-7.24]); gestational diabetes (overweight 1.78 [1.25-2.52], obese 2.95 [2.05-4.25], morbidly obese 7.44 [4.42-12.54]); hospital admission longer than 5 days (overweight 1.36 [1.13-1.63], obese 1.49 [1.21-1.86], morbidly obese 3.18 [2.19-4.61]); and caesarean section (overweight 1.50 [1.36-1.66], obese 2.02 [1.79-2.29], morbidly obese 2.54 [1.94-3.32]). Neonates born to obese and morbidly obese women had an increased risk of birth defects (obese 1.58 [1.02-2.46], morbidly obese 3.41 [1.67-6.94]); and hypoglycaemia (obese 2.57 [1.39-4.78], morbidly obese 7.14 [3.04-16.74]). Neonates born to morbidly obese women were at increased risk of admission to intensive care (2.77 [1.81-4.25]); premature delivery (< 34 weeks' gestation) (2.13 [1.13-4.01]); and jaundice (1.44 [1.09-1.89]). Overweight and obesity are common in pregnant women. Increasing BMI is associated with maternal and neonatal outcomes that may increase the costs of obstetric care. To assist in planning health service delivery, we believe that BMI should be routinely recorded on perinatal data collection sheets.
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              Prevalence and determinants of common perinatal mental disorders in women in low- and lower-middle-income countries: a systematic review

              OBJECTIVE: To review the evidence about the prevalence and determinants of non-psychotic common perinatal mental disorders (CPMDs) in World Bank categorized low- and lower-middle-income countries. METHODS: Major databases were searched systematically for English-language publications on the prevalence of non-psychotic CPMDs and on their risk factors and determinants. All study designs were included. FINDINGS: Thirteen papers covering 17 low- and lower-middle-income countries provided findings for pregnant women, and 34, for women who had just given birth. Data on disorders in the antenatal period were available for 9 (8%) countries, and on disorders in the postnatal period, for 17 (15%). Weighted mean prevalence was 15.6% (95% confidence interval, CI: 15.4-15.9) antenatally and 19.8% (19.5-20.0) postnatally. Risk factors were: socioeconomic disadvantage (odds ratio [OR] range: 2.1-13.2); unintended pregnancy (1.6-8.8); being younger (2.1-5.4); being unmarried (3.4-5.8); lacking intimate partner empathy and support (2.0-9.4); having hostile in-laws (2.1-4.4); experiencing intimate partner violence (2.11-6.75); having insufficient emotional and practical support (2.8-6.1); in some settings, giving birth to a female (1.8-2.6), and having a history of mental health problems (5.1-5.6). Protective factors were: having more education (relative risk: 0.5; P = 0.03); having a permanent job (OR: 0.64; 95% CI: 0.4-1.0); being of the ethnic majority (OR: 0.2; 95% CI: 0.1-0.8) and having a kind, trustworthy intimate partner (OR: 0.52; 95% CI: 0.3-0.9). CONCLUSION: CPMDs are more prevalent in low- and lower-middle-income countries, particularly among poorer women with gender-based risks or a psychiatric history.
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                Author and article information

                Contributors
                Journal
                Prev Med Rep
                Prev Med Rep
                Preventive Medicine Reports
                Elsevier
                2211-3355
                05 April 2019
                June 2019
                05 April 2019
                : 14
                Affiliations
                [a ]Monash Centre for Health Research and Implementation, School of Public Health and Preventive Medicine, Monash University, Level 1, 43-51 Kanooka Grove, Clayton, Melbourne 3168, Australia
                [b ]School of Psychology, Deakin University, Locked Bag 20000, Geelong 3220, Australia
                [c ]Centre for Social and Early Emotional Development, School of Psychology, Deakin University, Locked Bag 20000, Geelong 3220, Australia
                [d ]Psychology, Faculty of Natural Sciences, University of Stirling, FK9 4LA, United Kingdom
                Author notes
                [* ]Corresponding authors at: Monash Centre for Health Research and Implementation, School of Public Health and Preventive Medicine, Monash University, Level 1, 43-51 Kanooka Grove, Clayton, VIC 3168, Australia. briony.hill@ 123456monash.edu helen.skouteris@ 123456monash.edu
                [1]

                Present address: Monash Centre for Health Research and Implementation, School of Public Health and Preventive Medicine, Monash University, Level 1, 43-51 Kanooka Grove, Clayton, Melbourne 3168, Australia.

                Article
                S2211-3355(19)30053-1 100869
                10.1016/j.pmedr.2019.100869
                6465583
                31011520
                © 2019 Published by Elsevier Inc.

                This is an open access article under the CC BY-NC-ND license (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/).

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