20
views
0
recommends
+1 Recommend
0 collections
    0
    shares
      • Record: found
      • Abstract: found
      • Article: not found

      Roles for Intestinal Bacteria, Viruses, and Fungi in Pathogenesis of Inflammatory Bowel Diseases and Therapeutic Approaches

      research-article
      1 , 2
      Gastroenterology

      Read this article at

      ScienceOpenPublisherPMC
      Bookmark
          There is no author summary for this article yet. Authors can add summaries to their articles on ScienceOpen to make them more accessible to a non-specialist audience.

          Abstract

          Intestinal microbiota are involved in the pathogenesis of Crohn’s disease, ulcerative colitis, and pouchitis. We review the mechanisms by which these gut bacteria, fungi, and viruses mediate mucosal homeostasis, via their composite genes (metagenome) and metabolic products (metabolome). We explain how alterations to their profiles and functions under conditions of dysbiosis contribute to inflammation and effector immune responses that mediate inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) in humans and enterocolitis in mice. It could be possible to engineer the intestinal environment by modifying the microbiota community structure or function to treat patients with IBD— either with individual agents, via dietary management, or as adjuncts to immunosuppressive drugs. We summarize the latest information on therapeutic use of fecal microbial transplantation and propose improved strategies to selectively normalize the dysbiotic microbiome in personalized approaches to treatment.

          Related collections

          Author and article information

          Journal
          0374630
          3841
          Gastroenterology
          Gastroenterology
          Gastroenterology
          0016-5085
          1528-0012
          8 May 2017
          18 October 2016
          February 2017
          16 July 2017
          : 152
          : 2
          : 327-339.e4
          Affiliations
          [1 ]Departments of Medicine, Microbiology & Immunology, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC 27599
          [2 ]Division of Gastroenterology, Perelman School of Medicine, the University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA 19104
          Author notes
          Contact Info: R. Balfour Sartor, M.D., Rm 7309A, Biomolecular Research Bldg. (MBRB), 111 Mason Farm Road, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Chapel Hill, NC 27599-7032, Phone: (919) 966-0149, rbs@ 123456med.unc.edu . Gary D. Wu, MD, Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, 915 BRB II/III, 421 Curie Blvd, Philadelphia, PA 19104, Phone: 215-898-0158, gdwu@ 123456mail.med.upenn.edu
          [*]

          Co-corresponding authors:

          Article
          PMC5511756 PMC5511756 5511756 nihpa873095
          10.1053/j.gastro.2016.10.012
          5511756
          27769810
          3373b1b5-06c8-474a-944a-8e8e85ab64e8
          History
          Categories
          Article

          Comments

          Comment on this article