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      Structure and properties of dynamic metal–organic frameworks: a brief accounts of crystalline-to-crystalline and crystalline-to-amorphous transformations

      1 , 2 , 3 , 4 , 1 , 2 , 3 , 4

      CrystEngComm

      Royal Society of Chemistry (RSC)

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          Abstract

          External stimuli-driven structural changes and the associated properties of dynamic MOFs are discussed with examples.

          Abstract

          In the last decade, dynamic metal–organic frameworks (MOFs) have been under the intense scrutiny of chemical researchers for their potential applications in many interesting fields. Due to the flexibility in the structure, this class of materials can recognize or respond towards a signal by changing their structural architecture as well as their physiochemical properties. Therefore dynamic MOFs can be considered as “smart materials” for their use in many future technologies. All the transformations of a dynamic MOF occur through solid-state structural changes, hence these dynamicity driven materials sometimes have unique structures that cannot be derived by conventional synthetic methods. So far, a mammoth study has been performed about the synthetic procedures and applications of dynamic metal–organic frameworks. The stimuli response, which is the most important parameter in the dynamism of such structures, has also been elaborately discussed. Most of the previous review works in this area have covered the structure-stimuli-application flowchart, but in this highlight we discuss the point-to-point structural changes with an aim to understand the dynamicity pathway process of MOFs. Some associated changes in their properties, precisely, after and before structural changes, are also covered.

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          Most cited references 75

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          Metal-organic framework materials as chemical sensors.

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            Metal-organic frameworks in biomedicine.

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              Large breathing effects in three-dimensional porous hybrid matter: facts, analyses, rules and consequences.

              This critical review focuses on a strange behaviour of crystallized solid matter: its reversible swelling with large magnitude. This will be of interest for experts in porous solids but also for solid state chemists and physicists. Some examples, classified according to the dimensionality of the inorganic subnetwork, present the general requirements and the structural rules which govern the existence of this phenomenon. Its consequences concern specific applications related to sensors, energy savings, sustainable development and health (100 references).
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                Author and article information

                Journal
                CRECF4
                CrystEngComm
                CrystEngComm
                Royal Society of Chemistry (RSC)
                1466-8033
                2018
                2018
                : 20
                : 10
                : 1322-1345
                Affiliations
                [1 ]Department of Chemistry
                [2 ]Jadavpur University
                [3 ]Kolkata
                [4 ]India
                Article
                10.1039/C7CE02066J
                © 2018

                http://rsc.li/journals-terms-of-use

                Product
                Self URI (article page): http://xlink.rsc.org/?DOI=C7CE02066J

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