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      MicroRNA regulation of atherosclerosis

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          Abstract

          Atherosclerosis and its attendant clinical complications such as myocardial infarction, stroke, and peripheral artery disease, are the leading cause of morbidity and mortality in western societies. In response to biochemical and biomechanical stimuli, atherosclerotic lesion formation occurs from the participation of a range of cell types, inflammatory mediators, and shear stress. Over the past decade, microRNAs have emerged as evolutionarily conserved, non-coding small RNAs that serve as important regulators and “fine-tuners” of a range of pathophysiological cellular effects and molecular signaling pathways involved in atherosclerosis. Accumulating studies reveal the importance of miRNAs in regulating key signaling and lipid homeostasis pathways that alter the balance of atherosclerotic plaque progression and regression. In this review, we highlight current paradigms of microRNA-mediated effects in atherosclerosis progression and regression. We provide an update on the potential use of miRNAs diagnostically for detecting increasing severity of coronary disease and clinical events. Finally, we provide a perspective on therapeutic opportunities and challenges for miRNA delivery in the field.

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          Author and article information

          Journal
          0047103
          2974
          Circ Res
          Circ. Res.
          Circulation research
          0009-7330
          1524-4571
          28 January 2016
          19 February 2016
          19 February 2017
          : 118
          : 4
          : 703-720
          Affiliations
          [1 ]Department of Medicine, Cardiovascular Division, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02115
          [2 ]Departments of Medicine and Cell Biology, Leon H Charney Division of Cardiology, New York University Medical Center, New York, NY 10016
          Author notes
          Correspondence to: Mark W. Feinberg, MD, Department of Medicine, Cardiovascular Division, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Harvard Medical School, 77 Avenue Louis Pasteur, NRB-742F, Boston, MA 02115. Tel: (617) 525-4381, Fax: (617) 525-4380, mfeinberg@ 123456partners.org OR to Kathryn Moore, PhD, Division of Cardiology, New York University Medical Center, 520 First Avenue, Smillow 705, New York, NY 10016. Kathryn.moore@ 123456nyumc.org
          Article
          PMC4762069 PMC4762069 4762069 nihpa753671
          10.1161/CIRCRESAHA.115.306300
          4762069
          26892968
          33a3ed96-f06e-42f0-a2f7-58cc81b9a518
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          Article

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