1
views
0
recommends
+1 Recommend
1 collections
    0
    shares
      • Record: found
      • Abstract: found
      • Article: found
      Is Open Access

      Warm, not cold temperatures contributed to a Late Miocene reef decline in the Coral Sea

      research-article

      Read this article at

      Bookmark
          There is no author summary for this article yet. Authors can add summaries to their articles on ScienceOpen to make them more accessible to a non-specialist audience.

          Abstract

          Evidence shows that in the modern ocean, coral reefs are disappearing, and these losses are tied to climate change. However, research also shows that coral reefs can adapt rapidly to changing conditions leading some researchers to suggest that some reef systems will survive future climate change through adaptation. It is known that there were changes in the area covered by coral reefs in the past. Therefore, it is important to investigate the long-term response of coral reefs to environmental changes and high sea-surface temperatures (SSTs). However, because of diagenetic issues with SST proxies in neritic, metastable carbonate-rich environments, there is an incomplete and sometimes even incorrect understanding of how changes in SSTs affect carbonate reef systems. A good example is the Queensland Plateau offshore northeast Australia next to the threatened Great Barrier Reef. In the Late Miocene, between 11 and 7 Ma, a partial drowning caused the reef area on the Queensland Plateau to decline by ~ 50% leading to a Late Miocene change in platform geometry from a reef rimmed platform to a carbonate ramp. This reef decline was interpreted to be the result of SSTs at the lower limit of the modern reef growth window (20–18 °C). This article presents a new Late Miocene—ased SST record from the Coral Sea based on the TEX 86 H molecular paleothermometer, challenging this long held view. Our new record indicates warm tropical SSTs (27–32 °C) at the upper end of the modern reef growth window. We suggest that the observed temperatures potentially exceeded the optimal calcification temperatures of corals. In combination with a low aragonite supersaturation in the ocean, this could have reduced coral growth rates and ultimately lowered the aggradation potential of the reef system. These sub-optimal growth rates could have made the coral reefs more susceptible to other stressors, such as relative sea-level rise and/or changes in currents leading to reef drowning. Given that these changes affected coral reefs that were likely adapted to high temperature/low aragonite saturation conditions suggests that reefs that have adapted to non-ideal conditions may still be susceptible to future climate changes due to the interaction of multiple stressors associated with climate change.

          Related collections

          Most cited references65

          • Record: found
          • Abstract: not found
          • Article: not found

          Distributional variations in marine crenarchaeotal membrane lipids: a new tool for reconstructing ancient sea water temperatures?

            Bookmark
            • Record: found
            • Abstract: not found
            • Article: not found

            A novel proxy for terrestrial organic matter in sediments based on branched and isoprenoid tetraether lipids

              Bookmark
              • Record: found
              • Abstract: not found
              • Article: not found

              Environmental Limits to Coral Reef Development: Where Do We Draw the Line?

                Bookmark

                Author and article information

                Contributors
                benjamin.petrick@ifg.uni-kiel.de
                Journal
                Sci Rep
                Sci Rep
                Scientific Reports
                Nature Publishing Group UK (London )
                2045-2322
                10 March 2023
                10 March 2023
                2023
                : 13
                : 4015
                Affiliations
                [1 ]GRID grid.9764.c, ISNI 0000 0001 2153 9986, Institute of Geosciences, , Christian-Albrechts-Universität zu Kiel, ; Ludewig-Meyn-Straße 10, 24118 Kiel, Germany
                [2 ]GRID grid.5110.5, ISNI 0000000121539003, Institute of Earth Sciences, NAWI Graz Geocenter, , University of Graz, ; Heinrichstrasse 26, 8010 Graz, Austria
                [3 ]GRID grid.264756.4, ISNI 0000 0004 4687 2082, Department of Oceanography, , Texas A&M University, ; College Station, TX 77843 USA
                Article
                31034
                10.1038/s41598-023-31034-8
                10006184
                36899047
                33b2a986-c478-4098-bcb1-a3ec3c0b0108
                © The Author(s) 2023

                Open Access This article is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License, which permits use, sharing, adaptation, distribution and reproduction in any medium or format, as long as you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons licence, and indicate if changes were made. The images or other third party material in this article are included in the article's Creative Commons licence, unless indicated otherwise in a credit line to the material. If material is not included in the article's Creative Commons licence and your intended use is not permitted by statutory regulation or exceeds the permitted use, you will need to obtain permission directly from the copyright holder. To view a copy of this licence, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/.

                History
                : 6 October 2022
                : 6 March 2023
                Funding
                Funded by: FundRef http://dx.doi.org/10.13039/501100001659, Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft;
                Award ID: 447611930
                Award Recipient :
                Funded by: Christian-Albrechts-Universität zu Kiel (3094)
                Categories
                Article
                Custom metadata
                © The Author(s) 2023

                Uncategorized
                biogeochemistry,marine biology,palaeoceanography
                Uncategorized
                biogeochemistry, marine biology, palaeoceanography

                Comments

                Comment on this article