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GPR155 Serves as a Predictive Biomarker for Hematogenous Metastasis in Patients with Gastric Cancer

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      Abstract

      The prognosis of patients with gastric cancer (GC) with hematogenous metastasis is dismal. Identification of biomarkers specific for hematogenous metastasis is required to develop personalized treatments that improve patients’ outcomes. Global expression profiling of GC tissues with synchronous hepatic metastasis without metastasis to the peritoneal cavity or distant lymph nodes was conducted using next-generation sequencing and identified the G protein-coupled receptor 155 ( GPR155) as a candidate biomarker. GPR155 transcription was suppressed in GC cell lines compared with a nontumorigenic cell line. DNA methylation of the GPR155 promoter region was not detected, albeit 20% of GC cell lines harbored copy number loss at GPR155 locus. The expression levels of GPR155 mRNA correlated inversely with those of TWIST1 and WNT5B. Inhibition of GPR155 expression increased the levels of p-ERK1/2 and p-STAT1, significantly increased cell proliferation, and increased the invasiveness of a GC cell lines. GPR155 mRNA levels in GC clinical samples correlated with hematogenous metastasis and recurrence. Multivariate analysis revealed that reduced expression of GPR155 mRNA was an independent predictive marker of hematogenous metastasis. GPR155 may represent a biomarker for diagnosing and predicting hematogenous metastasis of GC.

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            Author and article information

            Affiliations
            [1 ]Department of Gastroenterological Surgery (Surgery II), Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine , Nagoya, Japan
            Author notes
            Journal
            Sci Rep
            Sci Rep
            Scientific Reports
            Nature Publishing Group
            2045-2322
            06 February 2017
            2017
            : 7
            28165032
            5292715
            srep42089
            10.1038/srep42089
            Copyright © 2017, The Author(s)

            This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License. The images or other third party material in this article are included in the article’s Creative Commons license, unless indicated otherwise in the credit line; if the material is not included under the Creative Commons license, users will need to obtain permission from the license holder to reproduce the material. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/

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