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      NGTS-19b : A high mass transiting brown dwarf in a 17-day eccentric orbi

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          Abstract

          We present the discovery of NGTS-19b, a high mass transiting brown dwarf discovered by the Next Generation Transit Survey (NGTS). We investigate the system using follow up photometry from the South African Astronomical Observatory, as well as sector 11 TESS data, in combination with radial velocity measurements from the CORALIE spectrograph to precisely characterise the system. We find that NGTS-19b is a brown dwarf companion to a K-star, with a mass of \(69.5 ^{+5.7}_{-5.4}\) M\(_{Jup}\) and radius of \(1.034 ^{+0.055}_{-0.053}\) R\(_{Jup}\). The system has a reasonably long period of 17.84 days, and a high degree of eccentricity of \(0.3767 ^{+0.0061}_{-0.0061}\). The mass and radius of the brown dwarf imply an age of \(0.46 ^{+0.26}_{-0.15}\) Gyr, however this is inconsistent with the age determined from the host star SED, suggesting that the brown dwarf may be inflated. This is unusual given that its large mass and relatively low levels of irradiation would make it much harder to inflate. NGTS-19b adds to the small, but growing number of brown dwarfs transiting main sequence stars, and is a valuable addition as we begin to populate the so called brown dwarf desert.

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          Author and article information

          Journal
          18 May 2021
          Article
          2105.08574

          http://arxiv.org/licenses/nonexclusive-distrib/1.0/

          Custom metadata
          Accepted for Publication in MNRAS
          astro-ph.EP astro-ph.SR

          Planetary astrophysics, Solar & Stellar astrophysics

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