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      Knowledge, attitude, and practice regarding COVID-19 outbreak in Bangladesh: An online-based cross-sectional study

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          Abstract

          In Bangladesh, an array of measures have been adopted to control the rapid spread of the COVID-19 epidemic. Such general population control measures could significantly influence perception, knowledge, attitudes, and practices (KAP) towards COVID-19. Here, we assessed KAP towards COVID-19 immediately after the lock-down measures were implemented and during the rapid rise period of the outbreak. Online-based cross-sectional study conducted from March 29 to April 19, 2020, involving Bangladeshi residents aged 12–64 years, recruited via social media. After consenting, participants completed an online survey assessing socio-demographic variables, perception, and KAP towards COVID-19. Of the 2017 survey participants, 59.8% were male, the majority were students (71.2%), aged 21–30 years (57.9%), having a bachelor's degree (61.0%), having family income >30,000 BDT (50.0%), and living in urban areas (69.8). The survey revealed that 48.3% of participants had more accurate knowledge, 62.3% had more positive attitudes, and 55.1% had more frequent practices regarding COVID-19 prevention. Majority (96.7%) of the participants agreed ‘COVID-19 is a dangerous disease’, almost all (98.7%) participants wore a face mask in crowded places, 98.8% agreed to report a suspected case to health authorities, and 93.8% implemented washing hands with soap and water. In multiple logistic regression analyses, COVID-19 more accurate knowledge was associated with age and residence. Sociodemographic factors such as being older, higher education, employment, monthly family income >30,000 BDT, and having more frequent prevention practices were the more positive attitude factors. More frequent prevention practice factors were associated with female sex, older age, higher education, family income > 30,000 BDT, urban area residence, and having more positive attitudes. To improve KAP of general populations is crucial during the rapid rise period of a pandemic outbreak such as COVID-19. Therefore, development of effective health education programs that incorporate considerations of KAP-modifying factors is needed.

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          Most cited references 29

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          Study of knowledge, attitude, anxiety & perceived mental healthcare need in Indian population during COVID-19 pandemic

          Highlights • There is moderate awareness related to transmission and symptoms of COVID-19 among educated population in India. • There is adequate awareness among public regarding preventive measures for COVID-19 infection. • There is a positive attitude of public towards social-distancing, avoiding party and travel and maintaining hygiene. • People report anxiety, worries, paranoia about acquiring infection and sleep disturbances during this pandemic. • More the 80 % people perceive mental healthcare need to deal with their issues during this COVID-19 pandemic.
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            The Use of Cronbach’s Alpha When Developing and Reporting Research Instruments in Science Education

             Keith Taber (2018)
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              Fear and Stigma: The Epidemic within the SARS Outbreak

              Because of their evolving nature and inherent scientific uncertainties, outbreaks of emerging infectious diseases can be associated with considerable fear in the general public or in specific communities, especially when illness and deaths are substantial. Mitigating fear and discrimination directed toward persons infected with, and affected by, infectious disease can be important in controlling transmission. Persons who are feared and stigmatized may delay seeking care and remain in the community undetected. This article outlines efforts to rapidly assess, monitor, and address fears associated with the 2003 severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) epidemic in the United States. Although fear, stigmatization, and discrimination were not widespread in the general public, Asian-American communities were particularly affected.
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                Author and article information

                Contributors
                Role: Formal analysisRole: Investigation
                Role: ConceptualizationRole: Formal analysisRole: InvestigationRole: MethodologyRole: Project administrationRole: SupervisionRole: Writing – original draftRole: Writing – review & editing
                Role: Data curationRole: Formal analysisRole: InvestigationRole: Writing – review & editing
                Role: ConceptualizationRole: MethodologyRole: Writing – review & editing
                Role: InvestigationRole: Writing – review & editing
                Role: InvestigationRole: Writing – review & editing
                Role: Editor
                Journal
                PLoS One
                PLoS One
                plos
                plosone
                PLoS ONE
                Public Library of Science (San Francisco, CA USA )
                1932-6203
                9 October 2020
                2020
                9 October 2020
                : 15
                : 10
                Affiliations
                [1 ] Department of Public Health and Informatics, Jahangirnagar University, Savar, Dhaka, Bangladesh
                [2 ] Quest Bangladesh, Lalmatia, Dhaka, Bangladesh
                [3 ] Youth Research Association, Savar, Dhaka, Bangladesh
                [4 ] Department of Pharmacology, Uttara Adhunik Medical College, Uttara, Dhaka, Bangladesh
                [5 ] Universidad Nacional de San Agustín de Arequipa, Arequipa, Perú
                [6 ] Department of Child Health and the Child Health Research Institute, The University of Missouri School of Medicine, Columbia, MO, United States of America
                Uniwersytet Zielonogorski, POLAND
                Author notes

                Competing Interests: The authors have declared that no competing interests exist.

                Article
                PONE-D-20-16724
                10.1371/journal.pone.0239254
                7546509
                33035219
                © 2020 Ferdous et al

                This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.

                Page count
                Figures: 0, Tables: 6, Pages: 17
                Product
                Funding
                The authors received no specific funding for this work.
                Categories
                Research Article
                Medicine and Health Sciences
                Medical Conditions
                Infectious Diseases
                Viral Diseases
                Covid 19
                Biology and Life Sciences
                Psychology
                Psychological Attitudes
                Social Sciences
                Psychology
                Psychological Attitudes
                People and Places
                Geographical Locations
                Asia
                Bangladesh
                Earth Sciences
                Geography
                Human Geography
                Urban Geography
                Urban Areas
                Social Sciences
                Human Geography
                Urban Geography
                Urban Areas
                Earth Sciences
                Geography
                Geographic Areas
                Urban Areas
                Physical Sciences
                Chemistry
                Chemical Compounds
                Salts
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                Medicine and Health Sciences
                Medical Conditions
                Infectious Diseases
                Respiratory Infections
                Medicine and Health Sciences
                Medical Conditions
                Respiratory Disorders
                Respiratory Infections
                Medicine and Health Sciences
                Pulmonology
                Respiratory Disorders
                Respiratory Infections
                Computer and Information Sciences
                Computer Networks
                Internet
                Research and Analysis Methods
                Research Design
                Survey Research
                Surveys
                Custom metadata
                All relevant data are within the paper and its Supporting Information files. Anonymized complete dataset uploaded as well.
                COVID-19

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