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Differences in Brain Hemodynamics in Response to Achromatic and Chromatic Cards of the Rorschach : A fMRI Study

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Abstract

Abstract. In order to investigate the effects of color stimuli of the Rorschach inkblot method (RIM), the cerebral activity of 40 participants with no history of neurological or psychiatric illness was scanned while they engaged in the Rorschach task. A scanned image of the ten RIM inkblots was projected onto a screen in the MRI scanner. Cerebral activation in response to five achromatic color cards and five chromatic cards were compared. As a result, a significant increase in brain activity was observed in bilateral visual areas V2 and V3, parietooccipital junctions, pulvinars, right superior temporal gyrus, and left premotor cortex for achromatic color cards (p < .001). For the cards with chromatic color, significant increase in brain activity was observed in left visual area V4 and left orbitofrontal cortex (p < .001). Furthermore, a conjoint analysis revealed various regions were activated in responding to the RIM. The neuropsychological underpinnings of the response process, as described by Acklin and Wu-Holt (1996), were largely confirmed.

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Most cited references 37

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The assessment and analysis of handedness: The Edinburgh inventory

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The precuneus: a review of its functional anatomy and behavioural correlates.

Functional neuroimaging studies have started unravelling unexpected functional attributes for the posteromedial portion of the parietal lobe, the precuneus. This cortical area has traditionally received little attention, mainly because of its hidden location and the virtual absence of focal lesion studies. However, recent functional imaging findings in healthy subjects suggest a central role for the precuneus in a wide spectrum of highly integrated tasks, including visuo-spatial imagery, episodic memory retrieval and self-processing operations, namely first-person perspective taking and an experience of agency. Furthermore, precuneus and surrounding posteromedial areas are amongst the brain structures displaying the highest resting metabolic rates (hot spots) and are characterized by transient decreases in the tonic activity during engagement in non-self-referential goal-directed actions (default mode of brain function). Therefore, it has recently been proposed that precuneus is involved in the interwoven network of the neural correlates of self-consciousness, engaged in self-related mental representations during rest. This hypothesis is consistent with the selective hypometabolism in the posteromedial cortex reported in a wide range of altered conscious states, such as sleep, drug-induced anaesthesia and vegetative states. This review summarizes the current knowledge about the macroscopic and microscopic anatomy of precuneus, together with its wide-spread connectivity with both cortical and subcortical structures, as shown by connectional and neurophysiological findings in non-human primates, and links these notions with the multifaceted spectrum of its behavioural correlates. By means of a critical analysis of precuneus activation patterns in response to different mental tasks, this paper provides a useful conceptual framework for matching the functional imaging findings with the specific role(s) played by this structure in the higher-order cognitive functions in which it has been implicated. Specifically, activation patterns appear to converge with anatomical and connectivity data in providing preliminary evidence for a functional subdivision within the precuneus into an anterior region, involved in self-centred mental imagery strategies, and a posterior region, subserving successful episodic memory retrieval.
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Statistical parametric maps in functional imaging: A general linear approach

Author and article information

Affiliations
[1]Department of Arts and Sciences, Osaka Kyoiku University, Osaka Prefecture, Japan
[2]Institute of Socio-Arts and Sciences, Tokushima University, Japan
[3]Department of Child Development, University of Fukui, Japan
[4]Graduate School of Human Development and Environment, Kobe University, Japan
[5]Faculty of Psychological and Physical Science, Aichi Gakuin University, Japan
[6]National Mental Support Center for School Crisis, Osaka Kyoiku University, Japan
[7]Research Center for Child Mental Development, University of Fukui, Japan
[8]Biomedical Imaging Research Center, University of Fukui, Japan
Author notes
Masahiro Ishibashi, Department of Arts and Sciences, Osaka Kyoiku University, 4-698-1 Asahigaoka, Kashiwara, Osaka 582-8582, Japan, Fax +81 72 978-3625, E-mail isibasim@123456cc.osaka-kyoiku.ac.jp
Journal
Rorschachiana
Rorschachiana
ror
Rorschachiana
Hogrefe Publishing
1192-5604
2151-206X
1062016June 10, 2016
2016
: 37
: 1 , Special Issue: Neuroscience and the Rorschach
: 41-57
© 2016 Hogrefe Publishing

(Distributed under the Hogrefe OpenMind License http://dx.doi.org/10.1027/a000001)

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