26
views
0
recommends
+1 Recommend
0 collections
    0
    shares
      • Record: found
      • Abstract: found
      • Article: not found

      Neural connectivity of the lateral geniculate body in the human brain: diffusion tensor imaging study.

      Read this article at

      ScienceOpenPublisherPubMed
      Bookmark
          There is no author summary for this article yet. Authors can add summaries to their articles on ScienceOpen to make them more accessible to a non-specialist audience.

          Abstract

          A few studies have reported on the neural connectivity of some neural structures of the visual system in the human brain. However, little is known about the neural connectivity of the lateral geniculate body (LGB). In the current study, using diffusion tensor tractography (DTT), we attempted to investigate the neural connectivity of the LGB in normal subjects. A total of 52 healthy subjects were recruited for this study. A seed region of interest was placed on the LGB using the FMRIB Software Library which is a probabilistic tractography method based on a multi-fiber model. Connectivity was defined as the incidence of connection between the LGB and target brain areas at the threshold of 5, 25, and 50 streamlines. In addition, connectivity represented the percentage of connection in all hemispheres of 52 subjects. We found the following characteristics of connectivity of the LGB at the threshold of 5 streamline: (1) high connectivity to the corpus callosum (91.3%) and the contralateral temporal cortex (56.7%) via the corpus callosum, (2) high connectivity to the ipsilateral cerebral cortex: the temporal lobe (100%), primary visual cortex (95.2%), and visual association cortex (77.9%). The LGB appeared to have high connectivity to the corpus callosum and both temporal cortexes as well as the ipsilateral occipital cortex. We believe that the results of this study would be helpful in investigation of the neural network associated with the visual system and brain plasticity of the visual system after brain injury.

          Related collections

          Author and article information

          Journal
          Neurosci. Lett.
          Neuroscience letters
          Elsevier BV
          1872-7972
          0304-3940
          Aug 22 2014
          : 578
          Affiliations
          [1 ] Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, College of Medicine, Yeungnam University, 317-1, Daemyung dong, Namku, Daegu 705-717, Republic of Korea. Electronic address: khg0715@hanmail.net.
          [2 ] Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, College of Medicine, Yeungnam University, 317-1, Daemyung dong, Namku, Daegu 705-717, Republic of Korea. Electronic address: strokerehab@hanmail.net.
          Article
          S0304-3940(14)00514-X
          10.1016/j.neulet.2014.06.033
          24970751

          Comments

          Comment on this article