Blog
About

7
views
0
recommends
+1 Recommend
0 collections
    0
    shares
      • Record: found
      • Abstract: found
      • Article: found
      Is Open Access

      Frictional Behavior of Individual Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells Assessed By Lateral Force Microscopy

      Read this article at

      Bookmark
          There is no author summary for this article yet. Authors can add summaries to their articles on ScienceOpen to make them more accessible to a non-specialist audience.

          Abstract

          With the advancement of the field of biotribology, considerable interest has arisen in the study of cell and tissue frictional properties. From the perspective of medical device development, the frictional properties between a rigid surface and underlying cells and tissues are of a particular clinical interest. As with many bearing surfaces, it is likely that contact asperities exist at the size scale of single cells and below. Thus, a technique to measure cellular frictional properties directly would be beneficial from both a clinical and a basic science perspective. In the current study, an atomic force microscope (AFM) with a 5 µm diameter borosilicate spherical probe simulating endovascular metallic stent asperities was used to characterize the surface frictional properties of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) in contact with a metallic endovascular stent. Various treatments were used to alter cell structure, in order to better understand the cellular components and mechanisms responsible for governing frictional properties. The frictional coefficient of the probe on VSMCs was found to be approximately 0.06. This frictional coefficient was significantly affected by cellular crosslinking and cytoskeletal depolymerization agents. These results demonstrate that AFM-based lateral force microscopy is a valuable technique to assess the friction properties of individual single cells on the micro-scale.

          Related collections

          Most cited references 33

          • Record: found
          • Abstract: found
          • Article: not found

          The structure and function of the endothelial glycocalyx layer.

          Over the past decade, since it was first observed in vivo, there has been an explosion in interest in the thin (approximately 500 nm), gel-like endothelial glycocalyx layer (EGL) that coats the luminal surface of blood vessels. In this review, we examine the mechanical and biochemical properties of the EGL and the latest studies on the interactions of this layer with red and white blood cells. This includes its deformation owing to fluid shear stress, its penetration by leukocyte microvilli, and its restorative response after the passage of a white cell in a tightly fitting capillary. We also examine recently discovered functions of the EGL in modulating the oncotic forces that regulate the exchange of water in microvessels and the role of the EGL in transducing fluid shear stress into the intracellular cytoskeleton of endothelial cells, in the initiation of intracellular signaling, and in the inflammatory response.
            Bookmark
            • Record: found
            • Abstract: found
            • Article: not found

            Drug-induced changes of cytoskeletal structure and mechanics in fibroblasts: an atomic force microscopy study.

            The effect of various drugs affecting the integrity of different components of the cytoskeleton on the elasticity of two fibroblast cell lines was investigated by elasticity measurements with an atomic force microscope (AFM). Disaggregation of actin filaments always resulted in a distinct decrease in the cell's average elastic modulus indicating the crucial importance of the actin network for the mechanical stability of living cells. Disruption or chemical stabilization of microtubules did not affect cell elasticity. For the f-actin-disrupting drugs different mechanisms of drug action were observed. Cytochalasins B and D and Latrunculin A disassembled stress fibers. For Cytochalasin D this was accompanied by an aggregation of actin within the cytosol. Jasplakinolide disaggregated actin filaments but did not disassemble stress fibers. Fibrous structures found in AFM images and elasticity maps of fibroblasts could be identified as stress fibers by correlation of AFM data and fluorescence images.
              Bookmark
              • Record: found
              • Abstract: found
              • Article: not found

              Scanning probe-based frequency-dependent microrheology of polymer gels and biological cells.

              A new scanning probe-based microrheology approach is used to quantify the frequency-dependent viscoelastic behavior of both fibroblast cells and polymer gels. The scanning probe shape was modified using polystyrene beads for a defined surface area nondestructively deforming the sample. An extended Hertz model is introduced to measure the frequency-dependent storage and loss moduli even for thin cell samples. Control measurements of the polyacrylamide gels compare well with conventional rheological data. The cells show a viscoelastic signature similar to in vitro actin gels.
                Bookmark

                Author and article information

                Journal
                Materials (Basel)
                Materials (Basel)
                materials
                Materials
                MDPI
                1996-1944
                14 September 2010
                September 2010
                : 3
                : 9
                : 4668-4680
                Affiliations
                Department of Bioengineering, Clemson University, 301 Rhodes Research Center, Clemson, SC, 29634, USA; E-Mails: finou@ 123456clemson.edu (D.D); jhemmer@ 123456clemson.edu (J.H.); vertege@ 123456clemson.edu (A.V.)
                Author notes
                [* ]Author to whom correspondence should be addressed; E-Mail: laberge@ 123456clemson.edu ; Tel.: +1-864-656-2611; Fax: +1-854-656-4466.
                Article
                materials-03-04668
                10.3390/ma3094668
                3113676
                21686041
                © 2010 by the authors.

                Licensee MDPI, Basel, Switzerland. This article is an open access article distributed under the terms and conditions of the Creative Commons Attribution license ( http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/).

                Categories
                Article

                Comments

                Comment on this article