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      Biodegradable metals

      , ,
      Materials Science and Engineering: R: Reports
      Elsevier BV

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          Synthetic biodegradable polymers as orthopedic devices

          Polymer scientists, working closely with those in the device and medical fields, have made tremendous advances over the past 30 years in the use of synthetic materials in the body. In this article we will focus on properties of biodegradable polymers which make them ideally suited for orthopedic applications where a permanent implant is not desired. The materials with the greatest history of use are the poly(lactides) and poly(glycolides), and these will be covered in specific detail. The chemistry of the polymers, including synthesis and degradation, the tailoring of properties by proper synthetic controls such as copolymer composition, special requirements for processing and handling, and mechanisms of biodegradation will be covered. An overview of biocompatibility and approved devices of particular interest in orthopedics are also covered.
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            Superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs): development, surface modification and applications in chemotherapy.

            At present, nanoparticles are used for various biomedical applications where they facilitate laboratory diagnostics and therapeutics. More specifically for drug delivery purposes, the use of nanoparticles is attracting increasing attention due to their unique capabilities and their negligible side effects not only in cancer therapy but also in the treatment of other ailments. Among all types of nanoparticles, biocompatible superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) with proper surface architecture and conjugated targeting ligands/proteins have attracted a great deal of attention for drug delivery applications. This review covers recent advances in the development of SPIONs together with their possibilities and limitations from fabrication to application in drug delivery. In addition, the state-of-the-art synthetic routes and surface modification of desired SPIONs for drug delivery purposes are described. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.
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              A physically transient form of silicon electronics.

              A remarkable feature of modern silicon electronics is its ability to remain physically invariant, almost indefinitely for practical purposes. Although this characteristic is a hallmark of applications of integrated circuits that exist today, there might be opportunities for systems that offer the opposite behavior, such as implantable devices that function for medically useful time frames but then completely disappear via resorption by the body. We report a set of materials, manufacturing schemes, device components, and theoretical design tools for a silicon-based complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) technology that has this type of transient behavior, together with integrated sensors, actuators, power supply systems, and wireless control strategies. An implantable transient device that acts as a programmable nonantibiotic bacteriocide provides a system-level example.
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                Author and article information

                Journal
                Materials Science and Engineering: R: Reports
                Materials Science and Engineering: R: Reports
                Elsevier BV
                0927796X
                March 2014
                March 2014
                : 77
                :
                : 1-34
                Article
                10.1016/j.mser.2014.01.001
                35a59098-1c39-4fd6-a16d-cd7ef3e11277
                © 2014
                History

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