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      COVID-19 and Neonatal Resuscitation

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      Neonatology

      S. Karger AG

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          Abstract

          In this issue of Neonatology, we publish two papers with suggestions for neonatal resuscitation when the mother is suspected of having COVID-19 infection [1, 2]. These papers come from Italy [1] where the COVID-19 pandemic has resulted in many thousands of deaths and from Hong Kong [2] where, in contrast, only 4 lives to date have been lost to the infection. These differences in outcomes between Europe and Asia will need to be explored in future research studies taking into account demographic factors [3] as well as government and medical responses. There is uncertainty about whether the COVID-19 virus can be transmitted vertically from mother to newborn infant either in utero or at birth. Although vertical transmission seems unlikely, there have been reports of early neonatal infection [4, 5]. Zhu et al. [4] reported some adverse outcomes in 10 babies born to mothers with COVID-19 infection. These adverse outcomes included fetal distress, premature labor, respiratory distress, thrombocytopenia and abnormal liver function, but the neonates themselves tested negative for the virus. It is likely that vertical transmission of the virus did not occur, and the neonatal complications were related to preterm delivery [4]. Zhang et al. [5] in a very recent report could only find 4 infected newborns in China and they presented aged between 30 h and 17 days after birth suggesting nosocomial infection. These babies had mild or no illness, none needed intensive care, and all seemed to have recovered. Three of the infants had been separated from their mother right after birth and were not breastfed [5]. We hope that you find the recommendations contained in these thoughtful reports from Italy [1] and Hong Kong [2] useful and helpful in planning perinatal care for infants at risk of developing COVID-19 infection. We wish all our readers well in their efforts to combat the effects of this terrible pandemic and salute all those healthcare workers in their dedication to the task. We are convinced that solutions will be found to overcome this deadly virus.

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          Most cited references 4

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          Neonatal Resuscitation Where the Mother Has a Suspected or Confirmed Novel Coronavirus (SARS-CoV-2) Infection: Suggestion for a Pragmatic Action Plan

          Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), caused by the novel SARS-CoV-2 virus, is rapidly spreading across the world. As the number of infections increases, those of infected pregnant women and children will rise as well. Controversy exists whether COVID-19 can be transmitted in utero and lead to disease in the newborn. As this chance cannot be ruled out, strict instructions for the management of mothers and newborn infants are mandatory. This perspective aims to be a practical support tool for the planning of delivery and neonatal resuscitation of infants born by mothers with suspected or confirmed COVID-19 infection.
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            Infection control measures for COVID-19 in labour suite and neonatal unit − A commentary

             PC Ng (2020)
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              • Abstract: not found
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              Demographic science aids in understanding the spread and fatality rates of COVID-19 [Online ahead of print]

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                Author and article information

                Journal
                Neonatology
                Neonatology
                NEO
                Neonatology
                S. Karger AG (Allschwilerstrasse 10, P.O. Box · Postfach · Case postale, CH–4009, Basel, Switzerland · Schweiz · Suisse, Phone: +41 61 306 11 11, Fax: +41 61 306 12 34, karger@karger.com )
                1661-7800
                1661-7819
                23 April 2020
                : 1
                Author notes
                *Henry L. Halliday, Editor-in-Chief
                **Christian P. Speer, Editor-in-Chief
                Article
                neo-0001
                10.1159/000508003
                7251574
                32325458
                Copyright © 2020 by S. Karger AG, Basel

                This article is made available via the PMC Open Access Subset for unrestricted re-use and analyses in any form or by any means with acknowledgement of the original source. These permissions are granted for the duration of the COVID-19 pandemic or until permissions are revoked in writing. Upon expiration of these permissions, PMC is granted a perpetual license to make this article available via PMC and Europe PMC, consistent with existing copyright protections.

                Page count
                References: 5, Pages: 1
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                Editorial Note

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