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      MORE EFFICIENT PLANTS: A Consequence of Rising Atmospheric CO2?

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          Abstract

          The primary effect of the response of plants to rising atmospheric CO2 (Ca) is to increase resource use efficiency. Elevated Ca reduces stomatal conductance and transpiration and improves water use efficiency, and at the same time it stimulates higher rates of photosynthesis and increases light-use efficiency. Acclimation of photosynthesis during long-term exposure to elevated Ca reduces key enzymes of the photosynthetic carbon reduction cycle, and this increases nutrient use efficiency. Improved soil-water balance, increased carbon uptake in the shade, greater carbon to nitrogen ratio, and reduced nutrient quality for insect and animal grazers are all possibilities that have been observed in field studies of the effects of elevated Ca. These effects have major consequences for agriculture and native ecosystems in a world of rising atmospheric Ca and climate change.

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          Author and article information

          Journal
          Annu Rev Plant Physiol Plant Mol Biol
          Annual review of plant physiology and plant molecular biology
          Annual Reviews
          1040-2519
          1040-2519
          Jun 1997
          : 48
          Affiliations
          [1 ] Smithsonian Environmental Research Center, P.O. Box 28, Edgewater, Maryland 21037, John Tabor Laboratories, The Department of Biological and Chemical Sciences, The University of Essex, Colchester, CO4 3SQ, United Kingdom.
          Article
          10.1146/annurev.arplant.48.1.609
          15012276
          3689e4d6-b560-430c-87bf-432577043c96
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