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      Predictors of successfully quitting smoking among smokers registered at the quit smoking clinic at a public hospital in northeastern Malaysia

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          Abstract

          Objective: The objectives of this study were to determine the proportion of smokers registered at the quit smoking clinic at a public hospital in northeastern Malaysia who successfully quit smoking and the predictive factors for successfully quitting smoking.

          Methods: This was a cross-sectional study involving smokers aged more than 18 years old and registered with the clinic from January 1, 2012, to October 31, 2014. Data were obtained with a designed questionnaire that consisted of sociodemographic information, medical history, smoking characteristics, and type of treatment received by smokers. Smokers who quit smoking 6 months after being registered at the quit smoking clinic were considered as successful quitters. Multiple logistic regression was applied to determine the predictive factors for successfully quitting smoking.

          Results: From a total of 202 respondents, 42.6% [95% confidence interval (CI) 35.8–49.4%] of them successfully quit smoking. Multiple logistic regression showed that the number of cigarettes smoked per day (adjusted odds ratio 2.51, 95% CI 1.17–5.41) and a previous quit attempt (adjusted odds ratio 1.88, 95% CI 1.03–3.44) were significant predictors for successfully quitting smoking.

          Conclusion: This study shows that the proportion of smokers who successfully quit smoking among smokers registered at the quit smoking clinic was relatively high. A number of cigarettes smoked per day of 20 or fewer and a previous quit attempt significantly predict successful quitting of smoking.

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          Most cited references 15

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          Individual-level predictors of cessation behaviours among participants in the International Tobacco Control (ITC) Four Country Survey.

           Q. Li,  R Borland,  Loren Fong (2006)
          The International Tobacco Control (ITC) Four Country Survey (ITC-4) is a prospective cohort study designed to evaluate the psychosocial and behavioural impact of national-level tobacco control policies enacted in the Australia, Canada, the UK, and the USA. Wave 1 of ITC-4 survey was conducted between October 2002 and December 2002. Wave 2 survey was conducted between May 2003 and August 2003. To test for individual-level predictors of smoking cessation behaviours (that is, quit attempts and smoking cessation) among cigarette smokers in the ITC Four Country Study measured between Wave 1 and Wave 2. This set of predictors will serve as the base for evaluating the added effect of tobacco control policies and other factors. Respondents included in this study are 6682 adult current smokers in the Wave 1 main survey who completed the Wave 2 follow-up (1665 were in Canada, 1329 were in the USA, 1837 were in the UK and 1851 were in Australia). Factors predictive of making a quit attempt included intention to quit, making a quit attempt in the previous year, longer duration of past quit attempts, less nicotine dependence, more negative attitudes about smoking, and younger age. Lower levels of nicotine dependence were the main factor that predicted future cessation among those that made a quit attempt. Intention to quit and other cognitive variables were associated with quit attempts, but not cessation. Behavioural variables related to task difficulty, including measures of dependence, predicted both making attempts and their success. Predictors of making quit attempts and cessation were similar for each of the four countries, but there were some differences in predictors of success.
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            Predictors of 6-month tobacco abstinence among 1224 cigarette smokers treated for nicotine dependence.

            This study examined baseline characteristics associated with abstinence from tobacco 6 months after treatment for nicotine dependence. A total of 1224 cigarette smokers (619 females, 605 males) receiving clinical services for treatment of nicotine dependence between January 1, 1995 and June 30, 1997 were studied. The intervention involves a 45-min consultation with a nicotine dependence counselor. A treatment plan individualized to the patient's needs is then developed. The main outcome measure was the self-reported 7-day point prevalence abstinence from tobacco obtained by telephone interview 6-months after the consultation. A bootstrap resampling methodology for predictor variable selection was used to identify a set of multivariate predictors of 6-month tobacco abstinence. Five variables were multivariately associated with tobacco abstinence: male gender, no current psychiatric diagnosis, higher stage of change, longest duration of previous abstinence from tobacco of or =30 days, and Fagerström Test for Nicotine Dependence (FTND) score of < or =5. Assessment of these variables may be useful clinically by assisting health care providers in tailoring nicotine dependence interventions to enhance outcomes.
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              Predictors of smoking cessation among adult smokers in Malaysia and Thailand: findings from the International Tobacco Control Southeast Asia Survey.

              Limited longitudinal studies on smoking cessation have been reported in Asia, and it remains unclear whether determinants of quitting are similar to those found in Western countries. This study examined prospective predictors of smoking cessation among adult smokers in Thailand and Malaysia.
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                Author and article information

                Journal
                FMCH
                Family Medicine and Community Health
                FMCH
                Compuscript (Ireland )
                2009-8774
                2305-6983
                December 2018
                December 2018
                : 6
                : 4
                : 178-183
                Affiliations
                1Department of Community Medicine, School of Medical Sciences, Universiti Sains Malaysia, Health Campus, 16150 Kota Bharu, Kelantan, Malaysia
                2Hospital Raja Perempuan Zainab 2, 15586 Kota Bharu, Kelantan, Malaysia
                Author notes
                CORRESPONDING AUTHOR: Mohd Nazri Shafei, Department of Community Medicine, School of Medical Sciences, Universiti Sains Malaysia, Health Campus, 16150 Kota Bharu, Kelantan, Malaysia, Tel.: +60-9-7676646, Fax: +60-9-7676654, E-mail: drnazri@ 123456usm.my
                Article
                FMCH.2018.0123
                10.15212/FMCH.2018.0123
                Copyright © 2018 Family Medicine and Community Health

                This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 Unported License (CC BY-NC 4.0), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited. See https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/.

                Page count
                Pages: 6
                Product
                Self URI (journal page): http://fmch-journal.org/
                Categories
                Original Research

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