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      Justice and Peace? How the International Criminal Tribunal Affects Societal Peace in Bosnia

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      Journal of Peace Research

      SAGE Publications

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          Most cited references 11

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          Repression of Human Rights to Personal Integrity in the 1980s: A Global Analysis.

          This crossnational study seeks to explain variations in governmental repression of human rights to personal integrity (state terrorism) in a 153-country sample during the eighties. We outline theoretical perspectives on this topic and subject them to empirical tests using a technique appropriate for our pooled cross-sectional time-series design, namely, ordinary least squares with robust standard errors and a lagged dependent variable. We find democracy and participation in civil or international war to have substantively important and statistically significant effects on repression. The effects of economic development and population size are more modest. The hypothesis linking leftist regime types to abuse of personal integrity rights receives some support. We find no reliable evidence that population growth, British cultural influence, military control, or economic growth affect levels of repression. We conclude by considering the implications of our findings for scholars and practitioners concerned with the prevention of personal integrity abuse.
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            The Consequences of Negotiated Settlements in Civil Wars, 1945–1993

             Roy Licklider (1995)
            We know very little about how civil wars end. Harrison Wagner has argued that negotiated settlements of civil wars are likely to break down because segments of power-sharing governments retain the capacity for resorting to civil war while victory destroys the losers' organization, making it very difficult to resume the war. An analysis of a data set of 91 post-1945 civil wars generally supports this hypothesis but only in wars over identity issues. Moreover, while military victories may be less likely to break down than negotiated settlements of identity civil wars, they are also more likely to be followed by acts of genocide. Outsiders concerned with minimizing violence thus face a dilemma.
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              The Correlates of War Data On War: an Update To 1997

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                Author and article information

                Journal
                Journal of Peace Research
                Journal of Peace Research
                SAGE Publications
                0022-3433
                1460-3578
                July 2016
                May 2005
                July 2016
                May 2005
                : 42
                : 3
                : 271-289
                Affiliations
                [1 ]Department of Political Science, University of North Texas,
                Article
                10.1177/0022343305052012
                36c55abd-f8bf-4a37-bd61-cc9768a1b698
                © 2005

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