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      Sexual Activity after First Acute Myocardial Infarction in Middle-Aged Men: Demographic, Psychological and Medical Predictors

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          Abstract

          The study examined important diverse sociodemographic, medical and psychological variables as potential predictors of sexual activity frequency/satisfaction in male patients following a first acute myocardial infarction (AMI). The sample comprised 276 Israeli male patients, age range 30–65 years, with a documented first AMI who were admitted to any of eight medical centers in Israel. All patients were sexually active prior to AMI. Data were elicited from interviews and medical charts on two occasions: before discharge and 3–6 months after AMI. The research variables explained a greater extent of the variance in sexual activity frequency than in satisfaction 3–6 months after AMI (32 and 23%, respectively). Sexual activity frequency/satisfaction prior to AMI were the major contributors to frequency/satisfaction after AMI. Of the other variables, age and education were the major contributors to sexual activity frequency; of these two variables, age was the sole contributor to sexual satisfaction. Medical and psychological variables (diabetes and depression) were minor contributors.

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          Most cited references 4

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          Life adjustment postmyocardial infarction: determining predictive variables.

          Sixty-eight patients with diagnosed myocardial infarctions were followed up for one year postinfarct onset to determine psychosocial adjustment. A previous pilot had differentiated between two groups of patients--depressive and deniers-who had poor vs good rehabilitation results, respectively. Results from this study substantiated previous findings in that 70% of those who were depressed postinfarct remained so throughout follow-up. These patients failed to remain at work and/or to function sexually and had a higher hospital readmission rate. The denial group, although still functioning with minimal psychosocial distress, was not distinguished from the remainder of the study population who generally also functioned well. Women postinfarct seemed to have the most difficult time, accounting for 80% of the deaths and 50% of the depressed group. Their noticeable type A behavior may account for this finding.
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            Sexual activity and the postcoronary patient.

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              Assessing the Health of the Nation

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                Author and article information

                Journal
                CRD
                Cardiology
                10.1159/issn.0008-6312
                Cardiology
                S. Karger AG
                0008-6312
                1421-9751
                1998
                December 1998
                15 October 2008
                : 90
                : 3
                : 207-211
                Affiliations
                a Cardiac Rehabilitation Institute, Chaim Sheba Medical Center, Tel-Hashomer, and Sackler Faculty of Medicine, Tel-Aviv University, Tel-Aviv, b Department of Psychology, Bar Ilan University, Ramat Gan, c Department of Family Medicine, Rabin Medical Center, Beilinson Campus, and Sackler Faculty of Medicine, Tel-Aviv University, Tel-Aviv, Israel
                Article
                6845 Cardiology 1998;90:207–211
                10.1159/000006845
                9892770
                © 1998 S. Karger AG, Basel

                Copyright: All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be translated into other languages, reproduced or utilized in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopying, recording, microcopying, or by any information storage and retrieval system, without permission in writing from the publisher. Drug Dosage: The authors and the publisher have exerted every effort to ensure that drug selection and dosage set forth in this text are in accord with current recommendations and practice at the time of publication. However, in view of ongoing research, changes in government regulations, and the constant flow of information relating to drug therapy and drug reactions, the reader is urged to check the package insert for each drug for any changes in indications and dosage and for added warnings and precautions. This is particularly important when the recommended agent is a new and/or infrequently employed drug. Disclaimer: The statements, opinions and data contained in this publication are solely those of the individual authors and contributors and not of the publishers and the editor(s). The appearance of advertisements or/and product references in the publication is not a warranty, endorsement, or approval of the products or services advertised or of their effectiveness, quality or safety. The publisher and the editor(s) disclaim responsibility for any injury to persons or property resulting from any ideas, methods, instructions or products referred to in the content or advertisements.

                Page count
                Tables: 2, References: 25, Pages: 5
                Categories
                Coronary Care

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