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      Effects of misinformation on COVID-19 individual responses and recommendations for resilience of disastrous consequences of misinformation

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          Abstract

          Proliferation of misinformation on social media platforms is faster than the spread of Corona Virus Diseases (COVID-19) and can generates hefty deleterious consequences on health amid a disaster like COVID-19. Drawing upon research on conspiracy theories, credibility evaluations, and misinformation, the current study empirically examines the effects of misinformation beliefs on COVID-19 individual responses. Using a self-administered online survey during COVID-19 pandemic, the study obtained 483 useable responses and after test, finds that, all inclusive, the propagation of misinformation on social media undermines the COVID-19 individual responses. Particularly, credibility evaluation of misinformation strongly predicts the COVID-19 individual responses with positive influences and religious misinformation beliefs as well as conspiracy beliefs come next and influence negatively. The findings and general recommendations will help public in general to be cautious about misinformation, and respective authority of a country in particular for initiating proper safety measures about disastrous misinformation in order to protect the public health from being exploited.

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          Most cited references 11

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          Addressing Health-Related Misinformation on Social Media

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            Defining and Measuring Credibility of Newspapers: Developing an Index

             Philip Meyer (2016)
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              Governance, technology and citizen behavior in pandemic: Lessons from COVID-19 in East Asia

              Corona Virus (CODID-19) was first reported in Wuhan in December 2019, then spread in different parts of China, and gradually became a global pandemic in March 2020. While the death toll is still increasing, the epicenter of casualty has shifted from Asia to Europe, and that of the affected people has shifted to USA. This paper analyzes the responses in East Asian countries, in China, Japan and South Korea, and provides some commonalities and lessons. While countries have different governance mechanism, it was found that a few governance decisions in respective countries made a difference, along with strong community solidarity and community behavior. Extensive use of emerging technologies is made along with medical/health care treatment to make the response more effective and reduce the risk of the spread of the disease. Although the pandemic was a global one, its responses were local, depending on the local governance, socio-economic and cultural context.
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                Author and article information

                Contributors
                Journal
                Progress in Disaster Science
                Published by Elsevier Ltd.
                2590-0617
                2590-0617
                21 July 2020
                21 July 2020
                Affiliations
                [a ]Department of Marketing, University of Chittagong, Chittagong 4331, Bangladesh
                [b ]School of Management, Wuhan University of Technology, Wuhan, China
                Author notes
                [* ]Corresponding author. zapan@ 123456cu.ac.bd
                Article
                S2590-0617(20)30056-9 100119
                10.1016/j.pdisas.2020.100119
                7373041
                © 2020 Published by Elsevier Ltd.

                Since January 2020 Elsevier has created a COVID-19 resource centre with free information in English and Mandarin on the novel coronavirus COVID-19. The COVID-19 resource centre is hosted on Elsevier Connect, the company's public news and information website. Elsevier hereby grants permission to make all its COVID-19-related research that is available on the COVID-19 resource centre - including this research content - immediately available in PubMed Central and other publicly funded repositories, such as the WHO COVID database with rights for unrestricted research re-use and analyses in any form or by any means with acknowledgement of the original source. These permissions are granted for free by Elsevier for as long as the COVID-19 resource centre remains active.

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