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      Divorce in Europe and the United States: Commonalities and differences across nations

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      Family Science

      Informa UK Limited

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          Children of divorce in the 1990s: an update of the Amato and Keith (1991) meta-analysis.

           P Amato (2001)
          The present study updates the P. R. Amato and B. Keith (1991) meta-analysis of children and divorce with a new analysis of 67 studies published in the 1990s. Compared with children with continuously married parents, children with divorced parents continued to score significantly lower on measures of academic achievement, conduct, psychological adjustment, self-concept, and social relations. After controlling for study characteristics, curvilinear trends with respect to decade of publication were present for academic achievement, psychological well-being, self-concept, and social relations. For these outcomes, the gap between children with divorced and married parents decreased during the 1980s and increased again during the 1990s.
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            Revisiting the Relationships among Gender, Marital Status, and Mental Health

             Robin Simon (2002)
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              Has the future of marriage arrived? A contemporary examination of gender, marriage, and psychological well-being.

              A long tradition of research and theory on gender, marriage, and mental health suggests that marital status is more important to men's psychological well-being than women's while marital quality is more important to women's well-being than men's. These beliefs rest largely on a theoretical and empirical foundation established in the 1970s, but, despite changes in gender and family roles, they have rarely been questioned. The present analysis of three waves of a nationally representative survey indicates that, with few exceptions, the effects of marital status, marital transitions, and marital quality on psychological well-being are similar for men and women. Further, for men and women, occupying an unsatisfying marriage undermines psychological well-being to a similar extent--and, in some cases, to a greater extent--than exiting marriage or being continually unmarried.
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                Author and article information

                Journal
                Family Science
                Family Science
                Informa UK Limited
                1942-4620
                1942-4639
                February 16 2010
                February 16 2010
                : 1
                : 1
                : 2-13
                Article
                10.1080/19424620903381583
                © 2010

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