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      Panuveitis and Optic Neuritis as a Possible Initial Presentation of the Novel Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19)

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          Standardization of Uveitis Nomenclature for Reporting Clinical Data. Results of the First International Workshop

          To begin a process of standardizing the methods for reporting clinical data in the field of uveitis. Consensus workshop. Members of an international working group were surveyed about diagnostic terminology, inflammation grading schema, and outcome measures, and the results used to develop a series of proposals to better standardize the use of these entities. Small groups employed nominal group techniques to achieve consensus on several of these issues. The group affirmed that an anatomic classification of uveitis should be used as a framework for subsequent work on diagnostic criteria for specific uveitic syndromes, and that the classification of uveitis entities should be on the basis of the location of the inflammation and not on the presence of structural complications. Issues regarding the use of the terms "intermediate uveitis," "pars planitis," "panuveitis," and descriptors of the onset and course of the uveitis were addressed. The following were adopted: standardized grading schema for anterior chamber cells, anterior chamber flare, and for vitreous haze; standardized methods of recording structural complications of uveitis; standardized definitions of outcomes, including "inactive" inflammation, "improvement'; and "worsening" of the inflammation, and "corticosteroid sparing," and standardized guidelines for reporting visual acuity outcomes. A process of standardizing the approach to reporting clinical data in uveitis research has begun, and several terms have been standardized.
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            Central Nervous System Involvement by Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus ‐2 (SARS‐CoV‐2)

            Abstract Neurologic sequelae can be devastating complications of respiratory viral infections. We report the presence of virus in neural and capillary endothelial cells in frontal lobe tissue obtained at postmortem examination from a patient infected with Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus‐2 (SARS‐CoV‐2). Our observations of virus in neural tissue, in conjunction with clinical correlates of worsening neurologic symptoms, pave the way to a closer understanding of the pathogenic mechanisms underlying CNS involvement by SARS‐CoV‐2. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.
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              2019-nCoV transmission through the ocular surface must not be ignored

              Chaolin Huang and colleagues 1 reported the epidemiology, symptoms, and treatment of patients infected by the 2019 novel coronavirus (2019-nCoV) in Wuhan, China. As ophthalmologists, we believe that transmission of 2019-nCoV through the eyes was ignored. On Jan 22, Guangfa Wang, a member of the national expert panel on pneumonia, reported that he was infected by 2019-nCoV during the inspection in Wuhan. 2 He wore an N95 mask but did not wear anything to protect his eyes. Several days before the onset of pneumonia, Wang complained of redness of the eyes. Unprotected exposure of the eyes to 2019-nCoV in the Wuhan Fever Clinic might have allowed the virus to infect the body. 2 Infectious droplets and body fluids can easily contaminate the human conjunctival epithelium. 3 Respiratory viruses are capable of inducing ocular complications in infected patients, which then leads to respiratory infection. 4 Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV) is predominantly transmitted through direct or indirect contact with mucous membranes in the eyes, mouth, or nose. 5 The fact that exposed mucous membranes and unprotected eyes increased the risk of SARS-CoV transmission 4 suggests that exposure of unprotected eyes to 2019-nCoV could cause acute respiratory infection. Thus, Huang and colleagues 1 should have analysed conjunctival scrapings from both confirmed and suspected 2019-nCoV cases during the onset of symptoms. The respiratory tract is probably not the only transmission route for 2019-nCoV, and all ophthalmologists examining suspected cases should wear protective eyewear.
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                Author and article information

                Journal
                Ocular Immunology and Inflammation
                Ocular Immunology and Inflammation
                Informa UK Limited
                0927-3948
                1744-5078
                August 17 2020
                September 01 2020
                August 17 2020
                : 28
                : 6
                : 922-925
                Affiliations
                [1 ]Ophthalmology Department, Hospital Clínico San Carlos, Madrid, Spain
                [2 ]Universidad Complutense, Madrid, Spain
                [3 ]Ophthalmology Department, Hospital Universitario Fundación Jiménez Díaz, Hospital Universitario Rey Juan Carlos, Madrid, Spain
                [4 ]Microbiology Department, Hospital Clínico San Carlos, Madrid, Spain
                Article
                10.1080/09273948.2020.1792512
                32870739
                38286eed-9ae9-4e3c-a356-b0865350d225
                © 2020
                History

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