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      Aplicación de la enzima SensiScript a un sistema RT-RCP para la obtención de ARN de VIH-1 a partir de muestras de suero almacenadas a -20 oC durante una década

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          Abstract

          Se demostró la eficacia de la enzima transcriptasa inversa SensiScript para obtener material genético útil en la secuenciación de ácido nucleico de VIH-1, a partir de sueros colectados entre 1989 y 1998 y conservados a temperatura subóptima. Con el empleo de la enzima SensiScript se obtuvo amplificación del ARN del VIH-1 en 86,5 % de las muestras estudiadas, comparado con 20 % al utilizar la enzima AMV-RT. En 13,5 % de las muestras no se obtuvo amplificación con ninguna de las 2 enzimas empleadas.

          Translated abstract

          The efficiency of SensiScript reverse transciptase to obtain useful genetic material in the sequencing of the nucleic acid from HIV-1, starting from sera collected between 1989 and 1998 and kept at suboptimal temperatures, was proved. On using the SensiScript enzyme it was obtained an amplification of the RNA of the HIV-1 in 86.5 % of the studied samples, compared with 20 % on using the AMV-RT enzyme . No amplification was obtained in 13.5 % of the studied samples with any of the 2 enzymes used.

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          Most cited references 15

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          An African HIV-1 sequence from 1959 and implications for the origin of the epidemic.

          There is considerable genetic diversity among viruses of different subtypes (designated A to J) in the major group of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1), the form of HIV that is dominant in the global epidemic. If available, HIV-1 sequences pre-dating the recognition of AIDS could be crucial in defining the time of origin and the subsequent evolution of these viruses in humans. The oldest known case of HIV-1 infection was reported to be that of a sailor from Manchester who died of an AIDS-like illness in 1959; however, the authenticity of this case has not been confirmed. Genetic analysis of sequences from clinical materials obtained from 1971 to 1976 from members of a Norwegian family infected earlier than 1971 showed that they carried viruses of the HIV-1 outlier group, a variant form that is mainly restricted to West Africa. Here we report the amplification and characterization of viral sequences from a 1959 African plasma sample that was previously found to be HIV-1 seropositive. Multiple phylogenetic analyses not only authenticate this case as the oldest known HIV-1 infection, but also place its viral sequence near the ancestral node of subtypes B and D in the major group, indicating that these HIV-1 subtypes, and perhaps all major-group viruses, may have evolved from a single introduction into the African population not long before 1959.
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            Effects of specimen collection, processing, and storage conditions on stability of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 RNA levels in plasma.

            To define the optimal blood collection parameters for plasma human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) viral load testing, plasma HIV-1 RNA levels were quantitated with the NASBA HIV-1 RNA QT System from blood specimens that were collected, processed, and stored under a variety of conditions that might have affected HIV-1 RNA stability. We determined that when whole blood was processed within 2 h of specimen collection the levels of HIV-1 RNA detected in EDTA-, heparin-, and acid citrate dextrose (ACD)-anticoagulated plasma samples were comparable. The levels of HIV-1 RNA in serum specimens (mean = 4.126 log units) were significantly lower (P < 0.01) than the levels in corresponding plasma samples (mean = 4.501 log units). One cycle of freeze-thaw (-70 degrees C) did not significantly reduce the level of HIV-1 RNA detected in EDTA-, heparin-, or ACD-anticoagulated plasmas. The EDTA-anticoagulated plasmas showed the smallest decrease in HIV-1 RNA copies (0.050 log units). HIV-1 RNA levels decreased over a 6-month time period in serum as well as in EDTA-, ACD-, and heparin-anticoagulated plasmas stored at -70 degrees C. However, the only significant decreases were for serum (mean decrease = 0.317 log units) and heparin-anticoagulated samples (mean decrease = 0.384 log units). A comparison of the levels of HIV-1 RNA in cell-free plasma collected in VACUTAINER EDTA Plasma Preparation Tubes and in standard VACUTAINER EDTA tubes determined that HIV-1 RNA levels were stable for up to 30 h after collection when stored at either room temperature (mean standard deviation [SD] = +/- 0.101 log units) or at 4 degrees C (mean SD = +/- 0.102 log units) as cell-free plasma or as EDTA-anticoagulated whole blood (mean SD = +/- 0.109 log units). These data indicate that EDTA-anticoagulated plasma is the most suitable and stable matrix for HIV-1 RNA quantitation.
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              Comparative stabilities of quantitative human immunodeficiency virus RNA in plasma from samples collected in VACUTAINER CPT, VACUTAINER PPT, and standard VACUTAINER tubes.

              This study compared the levels of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) virion RNA in plasma from whole blood collected in VACUTAINER CPT (cell preparation tube), VACUTAINER PPT (plasma preparation tube), VACUTAINER SST (serum separation tube), and standard VACUTAINER tubes with sodium heparin, acid citrate dextrose, sodium citrate, and potassium EDTA used as anticoagulants. Quantitative plasma HIV RNA levels were measured by branched-DNA signal amplification. Blood from all tubes was either processed within 1 to 3 h after collection or stored at room temperature or at 4 degrees C for analysis at 6 to 8 and 30 h postdraw. Immediately separated plasma from sodium citrate CPT tubes held at 4 degrees C maintained better stability of HIV RNA equivalents than whole blood held at room temperature or 4 degrees C. The highest number of HIV RNA equivalents was seen with EDTA VACUTAINER tubes. HIV RNA equivalents in all types of plasma were significantly higher than in SST tubes. Although a decline in HIV RNA equivalents was seen in all collection devices after 30 h, a significantly greater decline in plasma HIV RNA equivalents occurred in acid citrate dextrose VACUTAINER tubes than in citrate CPT, PPT, and standard EDTA VACUTAINER tubes. In order to minimize the variability of quantitative HIV RNA test results, our data suggest that samples collected for a particular assay should be processed at the same time postdraw using a particular tube type throughout a given study.
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                Author and article information

                Contributors
                Role: ND
                Role: ND
                Role: ND
                Role: ND
                Role: ND
                Journal
                mtr
                Revista Cubana de Medicina Tropical
                Rev Cubana Med Trop
                Centro Nacional de Información de Ciencias Médicas (Ciudad de la Habana )
                1561-3054
                December 2003
                : 55
                : 3
                : 213-216
                Affiliations
                [1 ] Universidade Estadual de Maringá Brazil
                [2 ] Universidad de Chapel Hil USA
                Article
                S0375-07602003000300015

                http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/

                Product
                Product Information: SciELO Cuba
                Categories
                TROPICAL MEDICINE

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