Blog
About

  • Record: found
  • Abstract: not found
  • Article: not found

From eco-catastrophe to zero deforestation? Interdisciplinarities, politics, environmentalisms and reduced clearing in Amazonia

Environmental Conservation

Cambridge University Press (CUP)

Read this article at

ScienceOpenPublisher
Bookmark
      There is no author summary for this article yet. Authors can add summaries to their articles on ScienceOpen to make them more accessible to a non-specialist audience.

      Related collections

      Most cited references 109

      • Record: found
      • Abstract: found
      • Article: not found

      Biodiversity hotspots for conservation priorities.

      Conservationists are far from able to assist all species under threat, if only for lack of funding. This places a premium on priorities: how can we support the most species at the least cost? One way is to identify 'biodiversity hotspots' where exceptional concentrations of endemic species are undergoing exceptional loss of habitat. As many as 44% of all species of vascular plants and 35% of all species in four vertebrate groups are confined to 25 hotspots comprising only 1.4% of the land surface of the Earth. This opens the way for a 'silver bullet' strategy on the part of conservation planners, focusing on these hotspots in proportion to their share of the world's species at risk.
        Bookmark
        • Record: found
        • Abstract: not found
        • Article: not found

        Ecosystem Decay of Amazonian Forest Fragments: a 22-Year Investigation

          Bookmark
          • Record: found
          • Abstract: found
          • Article: not found

          The 2010 Amazon drought.

          In 2010, dry-season rainfall was low across Amazonia, with apparent similarities to the major 2005 drought. We analyzed a decade of satellite-derived rainfall data to compare both events. Standardized anomalies of dry-season rainfall showed that 57% of Amazonia had low rainfall in 2010 as compared with 37% in 2005 (≤-1 standard deviation from long-term mean). By using relationships between drying and forest biomass responses measured for 2005, we predict the impact of the 2010 drought as 2.2 × 10(15) grams of carbon [95% confidence intervals (CIs) are 1.2 and 3.4], largely longer-term committed emissions from drought-induced tree deaths, compared with 1.6 × 10(15) grams of carbon (CIs 0.8 and 2.6) for the 2005 event.
            Bookmark

            Author and article information

            Journal
            applab
            Environmental Conservation
            Envir. Conserv.
            Cambridge University Press (CUP)
            0376-8929
            1469-4387
            March 2012
            September 2011
            : 39
            : 01
            : 4-19
            10.1017/S0376892911000452
            © 2012

            Comments

            Comment on this article