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      A realignment of marine biogeographic provinces with particular reference to fish distributions : Marine biogeographic provinces

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      Journal of Biogeography

      Wiley-Blackwell

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          Most cited references 72

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          Trends, rhythms, and aberrations in global climate 65 Ma to present.

          Since 65 million years ago (Ma), Earth's climate has undergone a significant and complex evolution, the finer details of which are now coming to light through investigations of deep-sea sediment cores. This evolution includes gradual trends of warming and cooling driven by tectonic processes on time scales of 10(5) to 10(7) years, rhythmic or periodic cycles driven by orbital processes with 10(4)- to 10(6)-year cyclicity, and rare rapid aberrant shifts and extreme climate transients with durations of 10(3) to 10(5) years. Here, recent progress in defining the evolution of global climate over the Cenozoic Era is reviewed. We focus primarily on the periodic and anomalous components of variability over the early portion of this era, as constrained by the latest generation of deep-sea isotope records. We also consider how this improved perspective has led to the recognition of previously unforeseen mechanisms for altering climate.
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            Phylogeography and historical ecology of the North Atlantic intertidal.

            Recent glaciation covered the full extent of rocky intertidal habitat along the coasts of New England and the Canadian Maritimes. To test whether this glaciation in fact caused wholesale extinction of obligate rocky intertidal invertebrates, and thus required a recolonization from Europe, we compared American and European populations using allelic diversity and techniques adapted from coalescent theory. Mitochondrial DNA sequences were collected from amphi-Atlantic populations of three cold-temperate obligate rocky intertidal species (a barnacle, Semibalanus balanoides, and two gastropods, Nucella lapillus and Littorina obtusata) and three cold-temperate habitat generalist species (a seastar, Asterias rubens; a mussel, Mytilus edulis, and an isopod, Idotea balthica). For many of these species we were able to estimate the lineage-specific mutation rate based on trans-Arctic divergences between Pacific and Atlantic taxa. These data indicate that some obligate rocky intertidal taxa have colonized New England from European populations. However, the patterns of persistence in North America indicate that other life-history traits, including mech anisms of dispersal, may be more important for surviving dramatic environmental and climatic change.
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              Regionally isolated populations of an imperiled Caribbean coral, Acropora palmata.

              The movements of larvae between marine populations are difficult to follow directly and have been the subject of much controversy, especially in the Caribbean. The debate centres on the degree to which populations are demographically open, such that depleted populations can be replenished by recruitment from distant healthy populations, or demographically closed and thus in need of local management. Given the depressed state of many tropical reef populations, the understanding of these movements now bears critically on the number, placement, and size of marine reserves. Most genetic analyses assume that dispersal patterns have been stable for thousands of generations, thus they commonly reflect past colonization histories more than ongoing dispersal. Recently developed multilocus genotyping approaches, however, have the demonstrated ability to detect both migration and population isolation over far shorter timescales. Previously, we developed five microsatellite markers and demonstrated them to be both Mendelian and coral-specific. Using these markers and Bayesian analyses, we show here that populations of the imperiled reef-building coral, Acropora palmata, have experienced little or no recent genetic exchange between the western and the eastern Caribbean. Puerto Rico is identified as an area of mixing between the two subregions. As a consequence of this regional isolation, populations in the western and eastern Caribbean should have the potential to adapt to local conditions and will require population-specific management strategies.
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                Author and article information

                Journal
                Journal of Biogeography
                Wiley-Blackwell
                03050270
                January 2012
                January 2012
                : 39
                : 1
                : 12-30
                Article
                10.1111/j.1365-2699.2011.02613.x
                © 2012

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