11
views
0
recommends
+1 Recommend
0 collections
    0
    shares
      • Record: found
      • Abstract: not found
      • Article: not found

      When Will Collective Action Be Effective? Violent and Non-Violent Protests Differentially Influence Perceptions of Legitimacy and Efficacy Among Sympathizers

      1 , 2
      Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin
      SAGE Publications

      Read this article at

      ScienceOpenPublisherPubMed
      Bookmark
          There is no author summary for this article yet. Authors can add summaries to their articles on ScienceOpen to make them more accessible to a non-specialist audience.

          Abstract

          Collective action will be effective in achieving broader social change goals to the extent that it influences public opinion yet the degree to which collective action "works" in changing opinion is rarely studied. Experiment 1 (n = 158) showed that, consistent with a logic of strategic non-violence, non-violent collective action more effectively conveys a sense of the illegitimacy of the issue and the efficacy of the group, thereby promoting support for future non-violent actions. Experiment 2 (n = 139) explored the moderating role of allegations of corruption. A social context of corruption effectively undermined the efficacy and legitimacy of non-violent collective action, relative to support for violence, thereby promoting (indirectly) support for future extreme action. The implications of this research, for the logic of strategic non-violence and mobilizing supportive public opinion, are discussed.

          Related collections

          Most cited references51

          • Record: found
          • Abstract: found
          • Article: not found

          The moderator-mediator variable distinction in social psychological research: conceptual, strategic, and statistical considerations.

          In this article, we attempt to distinguish between the properties of moderator and mediator variables at a number of levels. First, we seek to make theorists and researchers aware of the importance of not using the terms moderator and mediator interchangeably by carefully elaborating, both conceptually and strategically, the many ways in which moderators and mediators differ. We then go beyond this largely pedagogical function and delineate the conceptual and strategic implications of making use of such distinctions with regard to a wide range of phenomena, including control and stress, attitudes, and personality traits. We also provide a specific compendium of analytic procedures appropriate for making the most effective use of the moderator and mediator distinction, both separately and in terms of a broader causal system that includes both moderators and mediators.
            Bookmark
            • Record: found
            • Abstract: not found
            • Article: not found

            Asymptotic and resampling strategies for assessing and comparing indirect effects in multiple mediator models

              Bookmark
              • Record: found
              • Abstract: found
              • Book: not found

              Self-Efficacy : The Exercise of Control

              1 Theoretical Perspectives The Nature of Human Agency Human Agency in Triadic Reciprocal Causation Determinism and the Exercise of Self-Influence Related Views of Personal Efficacy 2 The Nature and Structure of Self-Efficacy Perceived Self-Efficacy as a Generative Capability Active Producers versus Passive Foretellers of Performances The Self-Efficacy Approach to Personal Causation Multidimensionality of Self-Efficacy Belief Systems Self-Efficacy Causality Sources of Discordance Between Efficacy Judgment and Action 3 Sources of Self-Efficacy Enactive Mastery Experience Vicarious Experience Verbal Persuasion Physiological and Affective States Integration of Efficacy Information 4 Mediating Processes Cognitive Processes Motivational Processes Affective Processes Selection Processes 5 Developmental Analysis of Self-Efficacy Origins of a Sense of Personal Agency Familial Sources of Self-Efficacy Peers and the Broadening and Validation of Self-Efficacy School as an Agency for Cultivating Self-Efficacy Growth of Self-Efficacy through Transitional Experiences of Adolescence Self-Efficacy Concerns of Adulthood Reappraisals of Self-Efficacy with Advancing Age 6 Cognitive Functioning Students' Cognitive Self-Efficacy Teachers' Perceived Efficacy Collective School Efficacy 7 Health Functioning Biological Effects of Perceived Self-Efficacy Perceived Self-Efficacy in Health Promoting Behavior Prognostic Judgments and Perceived Self-Efficacy 8 Clinical Functioning Anxiety and Phobic Dysfunctions Depression Eating Disorders Alcohol and Drug Abuse 9 Athletic Functioning Development of Athletic Skills Self-Regulation of Athletic Performance Collective Team Efficacy Psychobiological Effects of Physical Exercise 10 Organizational Functioning Career Development and Pursuits Mastery of Occupational Roles Self-Efficacy in Organizational Decision Making Self-Efficacy in Enactment of Occupational Roles Collective Organizational Efficacy 11 Collective Efficacy Gauging Collective Efficacy Political Efficacy Enablement by Media Modes of Influence Enablement for Sociocultural Change Underminers of Collective Efficacy References Name and Subject Indexes.
                Bookmark

                Author and article information

                Journal
                Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin
                Pers Soc Psychol Bull
                SAGE Publications
                0146-1672
                1552-7433
                October 21 2013
                February 2014
                December 05 2013
                February 2014
                : 40
                : 2
                : 263-276
                Affiliations
                [1 ]Murdoch University, Australia
                [2 ]The University of Queensland, Brisbane, Australia
                Article
                10.1177/0146167213510525
                24311435
                388d2159-fccc-4d73-8409-77b2a924f40f
                © 2014

                http://journals.sagepub.com/page/policies/text-and-data-mining-license

                History

                Comments

                Comment on this article